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Bestselling Audiobooks

The top 100 audiobooks on Libro.fm based on sales from our 1,000+ partner bookstore locations.

Last Updated •
  1. The Dutch House

    “I love Ann Patchett. The Dutch House is the story of brother and sister Danny and Maeve and how after losing their mother and then their father, they are cast out of the only home they know. It is then that Danny and Maeve realize they only have each other to rely on. Their relationship is complex and intriguing. Danny and Maeve are each other's saviors, but I am wondering if they are also not each other's downfall. I am finding that I can't put this story down. Wonderfully written. A great book club selection. Also, such a pleasure to listen to the Tom Hanks recording.”

    Anderson's Bookshop image Karen, Anderson's Bookshop
  2. Talking to Strangers

    “Instead of reading this important book outright, Gladwell uses a podcast-style format to really engage the listener. Thoroughly engaging, interesting, and enlightening, audio is definitely an excellent way to read this book.”

    Watermark Books image Melissa, Watermark Books
  3. #1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • In her most revealing and powerful memoir yet, the beloved activist, speaker, and bestselling author of Love Warrior and Carry On, Warrior explores the joy and peace we discover when we stop striving to meet the expectations of the world, and start trusting the voice deep within us.

    Untamed will liberate...
    Read More »

  4. If you enjoyed Little, Big, then you’ll love The Starless Sea.

    “Love, ghosts, libraries, presents, pasts, finding and losing, seeking and discovering, all intertwined in a puzzle-ring through which narrative lines twine and weave, until the reader's delight at knowing the characters and seeing the world bursts with glorious epiphany. Not since "Little, Big" have I read a book that so caught my fancy, nor since Gormenghast have I found such an all-absorbing and whimsical world, nor since Borges and Calvino have I touched such an intricate creation of story and meta-story. This is not just a book. It's a legend, and let me introduce you, reader, to the part you are to play....”

    The Haunted Bookshop image Nialle, The Haunted Bookshop
  5. The Splendid and the Vile

    “What riveting trip through the war on the capable albeit somewhat eccentric shoulders of Churchill. Not only does Larson provide a top-notch history of World War II, but he also provides an intimate look at the man and the family and associates of that one man, that unlikely hero, who now seems the only one who could have led Britain through the fight against Hitler. Highly recommended.”

    Raven Book Store image Kelly, Raven Book Store
  6. Circe

    “A bold retelling of the Circe episode from Homer's Odyssey that not only captures the interlocking pieces of Greek mythology, but also gives each god, titan, and Grecian a pulsing complexity. Both Circe the book and the character are quiet, sensual and--at times--freewheeling, adventurous, and devastating. Perdita Week's performance here is multi-layered and captivating. The voices she chooses to portray each character captures the unfolding drama and humor beautify.”

    Avid Bookshop image Luis, Avid Bookshop
  7. American Dirt (Oprah's Book Club)

    “Amazing. Incredible. Every American (every human) should read this. It's going to win every award and be every book club pick in 2020, as it should be. Nothing more needs to be said, really. The audiobook was FANTASTIC.”

    Anderson's Bookshop image Jackie, Anderson's Bookshop
  8. Where the Crawdads Sing

    Where the Crawdads Sing is a stunning and beautiful novel that readers will want to simultaneously savor and devour with every luxurious word. You’ll hear the gulls cry on the beach through these pages, you’ll see the light flickering through the marsh trees, you’ll smell the homemade grits sizzling on the stovetop. Your heart will ache for the lonely marsh girl and your wheels will start turning when a body is discovered, but you’ll never regret reading this gorgeous novel.”

    Bethany Beach Books image Amanda Zirn, Bethany Beach Books
  9. The House in the Cerulean Sea

    “There aren't many books that can leave you wishing you were a parentless magical child feared by the rest of the society. But with characters like the ones in The House in the Cerulean Sea, you can't help but wish you belonged to such a wonderful, magical family. And the dialogue! You will not be able to drive while listening to it because you'll be laughing way too hard!”

    Belmont Books image Chris, Belmont Books
  10. Educated

    “I loved this book! Tara Westover's memoir is the kind that sounds like it should be a novel—and this book reads like one in the best way—and I think I found myself gasping and covering my mouth about once per chapter. Westover describes her upbringing in a fundamentalist Mormon, survivalist, anti-government, anti-medicine family, enduring neglect and abuse and never attending school, in a way that still somehow manages to make her family members seem sympathetic despite their actions. She is honest about her early beliefs and conflicts and addresses her own lapses in memory throughout the book, and when she finally leaves home to go to college and beyond, you can't help but cheer for her. Julia Whelan does a fantastic job narrating the book, as well, giving each character a distinct personality, but in a way that isn't distracting to the story being told. Her voice is alternately innocent and chilling and gives an added depth to a fascinating story.”

    Bank Square Books image Elissa, Bank Square Books
  11. In Five Years

    “Rebecca Serle’s In Five Years has so many of the things I want in a terrific novel: a twisty plot that leaves me guessing; radically unexpected developments; settings that I can see, smell, and taste; and probably the thing that Serle does best — an introduction to characters I’ll grow to care about and shed tears with. That last one? The tear thing? In Five Years had me weeping for the last part of a coast-to-coast flight, prompting the flight attendant to hand me a drink because, she said, it looked like I needed one. I loved this book and can’t wait to offer it to readers.”

    Brookline Booksmith image Nick Petrulakis, Brookline Booksmith
  12. By Kevin Wilson / Narrated by Marin Ireland

    Nothing to See Here

    “Lillian will melt your heart. Well, maybe "melt" is a bit too descriptive for the brilliant but down-on-her-luck protagonist who agrees to care for twins Roland and Bessie, who, through no fault of their own, sometimes spontaneously combust. Kevin Wilson (The Family Fang) has a talent for weird but wonderful plots, and in his telling the trio -- committed to looking "normal" for the sake of the twins' US Senator father -- are sweet and smart. You'll be hoping for a happy ending, and wondering how Wilson can make it happen. Reader Marin Ireland reads all the characters with a perfect Tennessee inflection.”

    Market Block Books image Cheryl, Market Block Books
  13. By Celeste Ng / Narrated by Jennifer Lim

    Little Fires Everywhere

    “Little Fires Everywhere is a breathtaking novel about art, motherhood, and truth. Mia and her daughter, Pearl, move to the perfectly planned community of Shaker Heights as the last stop on their nomadic adventure, bringing some much-needed permanence to teenager Pearl's life. They both find friendship, but the connections they create with their landlord's family will soon change all of their lives. Impossible to put down or stop thinking about. A great read.”

    Stef Schmidt image Stef Schmidt, Water Street Books
  14. Things in Jars

    “Set in Victorian England, Things in Jars feels like a Sherlock Holmes story, if Holmes had been a woman. You can’t help but love Bridie Devine, a strong-willed, chain-smoking woman who has clawed her way from life as an orphaned thief to a highly sought-after detective often consulted by Scotland Yard. Bridie’s newest case, though, is proving difficult and incredibly strange. Not only will it force her to confront someone from her past who she thought was dead, she’ll also team up with an actual ghost as she solves a fantastical crime. Highly imaginative, Things in Jars is a fun and immersive read.”

    Bookmarks image Jamie Southern, Bookmarks
  15. The Ten Thousand Doors of January

    “This is the type of book that you can totally immerse yourself in, and when you reemerge, the world will feel like it has more magic and possibility than it did before. It is best read on a wet and dreary day, with lots of blankets around and a kettle full of tea. When you are finished, you will remember it like an old friend, as if you took an amazing adventure together. Which of course, you have.”

    Bright Side Bookshop image Amy, Bright Side Bookshop
  16. Oona Out of Order

    “Oona Lockhart has been cursed (or blessed) with a magical wrinkle in time that has her leaping forward and back through the years. Inside she is aging chronologically, but on the outside, Oona is sometimes 51, 30, or 26 years old. A life lived out of order, however, can be just as valid as a life lived forward. Surprising, bittersweet, and filled with love, Oona discovers both the wisdom of age and the spontaneity of youth. Don’t miss out on what is sure to be the most enchanted reading experience of 2020.”

    Excelsior Bay Books image Pamela Klinger-Horn, Excelsior Bay Books
  17. Becoming

    “I adore our former president and I miss him. Yet I cannot help but be ecstatic that Michelle is coming out with a book about her own life so that I can learn more about this powerful, intelligent, and singularly awesome woman. Barack would be the first to say that his wife is a superstar, and I can’t wait to get my hands on Becoming to read about her in her own words.”

    Bookshop Santa Cruz image Jax, Bookshop Santa Cruz
  18. Such a Fun Age

    “A racial comedy of manners for the digital age, Such a Fun Age is a hilarious and cringe-inducing look at white people trying to do the right thing: badly, and for all the wrong reasons. Nicole Lewis's reading is a dazzling feat: expertly code-switching between the voice Emira uses with her friends, to the voice she uses with her boss, Alix, to the voice her boss's suburban black friend, Tamara, uses with Alix, to the voice Tamara uses with Emira. I don't think I would have enjoyed this book half as much without this effortlessly nuanced narration.”

    The Book Table image Rachel, The Book Table
  19. The Silent Patient

    “When Theo Faber starts his new job at the Grove, a forensic psychiatric hospital, he is determined to work with the famous painter Alicia Berenson, who allegedly murdered her husband. What follows is a tale that will grip you and keep you guessing. With the incredible voice talent of Jack Hawkins, the audiobook elicits the feeling of something very slowly creeping up your spine, and will have you gripping your seat with anxiety throughout. An expansive cast of characters populates this novel, all with intricate connections and relationships, all with dark secrets of their own, making anyone and everyone a suspect. The ending twist was so intense and so unexpected, I had to pause the narration for a moment to scream and gather myself before I could move on. I highly recommend this audiobook for anyone who wants to explore the dark and twisted corners of the human psyche.”

    Oxford Exchange image Kaitlyn, Oxford Exchange
  20. From rising comedy star Cameron Esposito, a memoir that is "as hilarious and honest as she is on the stage," tackling the big issues explored in her comedy, including gender, sexuality and feminism - and how her Catholic childhood prepared her for a career as an outspoken lesbian comedian in ways the Pope could never have imagined (Abby... Read More »

  21. By Ronan Farrow / Narrated by Ronan Farrow

    Catch and Kill

    “A timely, incredibly important account of the difficulties Farrow faced at NBC while working on the Weinstein expose, which he took to the New Yorker and subsequently won a Pulitzer for. The audiobook is grippingly read by Farrow (though the accents he attempts are... let's go with 'confusing'). It's upsetting, sure, but heartening to see the exhaustive research and the very clearly laid-out account of how Farrow had to work against the very powerful high-profile members of the media establishment--including his own bosses--not only because of Weinstein's well-oiled intimidation machine but also as part of those figures attempting to cover up their own histories of being harassers. Highly recommend this important piece of current events journalism, which reads like a thriller novel.”

    A Room Of One's Own Bookstore image Gretchen, A Room Of One's Own Bookstore
  22. The Water Dancer (Oprah's Book Club)

    “Ta-Nehisi Coates understands something big and he understands it better than anyone else right now. The Water Dancer led me on a journey up and down the landscape of American slavery with a narrative that feels like The Book of Exodus meets, well, Ta-Nehisi Coates. Over 400 pages I have cried, I have laughed, I have been educated, and I have been enlightened. Coates writes with an honesty that can only come from a sublime, even spiritual, understanding of the souls of the white man and the black man in America. Written with poignancy and humanity, The Water Dancer left me stunned but clear-headed, like I had just been woken up from a deep, dream-filled sleep.”

    Norris Rettiger image Norris Rettiger, Lemuria Bookstore
  23. A New York Times "20 Books We're Watching For in 2020"

    An Entertainment Weekly, Newsweek, Bustle, Buzzfeed, GoodReads, Houston Chronicle, Writer's Digest, Medium, Washington Independent Review of Books, The Millions, Boston Globe, USA Today, and Women's Day Most Anticipated Book

    From the award-winning author of Station Eleven, an exhilarating...
    Read More »

  24. The Giver of Stars

    “In the late 1930s, the Works Progress Administration developed a number of projects intended to provide employment opportunities for unemployed artists, writers, and craftsmen. One of those projects was the Pack Horse Library Initiative, in which mounted horsewomen picked their way along snowy hillsides and through muddy creeks with a simple goal: to deliver reading material to Kentucky’s isolated mountain communities. In The Giver of Stars, Moyes has brought to life the amazing, funny, adventurous stories of a few of these trailblazing women. Historical fiction lovers will devour this story of a little-known piece of U.S. history.”

    The Country Bookshop image Angie Tally, The Country Bookshop
  25. City of Girls

    “City of Girls is the perfect read when you're looking for something that's not too heavy, yet engaging and entertaining. I loved the motley crew of perfectly flawed characters, unapologetic in their vices and dramas. And how refreshing it was to read about women, especially 1940s women, who were open in their sexuality and, dare I say, actually enjoyed sex! With multiple partners! How scandalous! Elizabeth Gilbert (who is a ray of sunshine in real life) has created something unique and heartwarming with her third fictional title. And if you're like me who finds audio fiction really hit or miss depending on the narrator, you'll be happy the hear that Blair Brown does a beautiful job of it.”

    Powell's Books image Michelle, Powell's Books
  26. Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You

    “What an amazing, passionate and fast-paced take on Kendi’s original Stamped from the Beginning! It takes you on a journey of racist ideas from then to now, the how and why it still lingers on. Reynolds’s engaging way with words will connect with young adults, and everyone else too. This is a book for everyone to read, so that we all can do better in identifying and stamping out racist thoughts.”

    Newtonville Books image Anne, Newtonville Books
  27. Daisy Jones & The Six

    “Written as an oral history chronicling the astronomic rise and fall of a Fleetwood Mac-esque rock band in the late '70s, DAISY JONES & THE SIX is a gorgeous, dishy, and profound book that I devoured in something like two days. The story races like gangbusters and cuts straight to the hearts and souls of the superbly-drawn characters, who all have a lot to say about music, creativity, fame, family, love, collaboration, and (of course) sex, drugs, and rock 'n' roll. Definitely one of my favorite books of the year so far!”

    One More Page image Rebecca, One More Page
  28. Eight Perfect Murders

    “Malcolm Kershaw is an unassuming bookseller who once wrote a list of the eight most perfect literary murders. He is surprised when the FBI shows up at his door and explains that someone is using this list and recreating the murders. With perfect pacing and shocking twists, this is a murder mystery with a classic feel that will leave you questioning how well you can know anyone. It will also add eight more books to your to-be-read pile as you will immediately need to read all the books on the perfect murder list!”

    Dog Ear Books image Carrie Deming, Dog Ear Books
  29. The Only Plane in the Sky

    “I absolutely believe this book should be listened to, instead of read. Each of the interviews and testimonies has a different voice, making this experience extremely intimate. I thought I knew. I had no idea. My memory is made up of all the big moments shared by the news. Planes, towers, explosions, the Pentagon, flight 93. All Images, experienced vicariously. Graff has collected first-hand accounts of 9/11 and woven them into a chronological masterpiece. I am awestruck by the tiniest of details, observations, moments. The following muffled silence, like that after a heavy snowfall. Streets filled with women’s shoes. (Think about it.) These testimonies fill in the spaces between the big images burned into our national psyche. These voices make it real. Make it human. Make it us.”

    Watermark Books image Robin, Watermark Books
  30. By Becky Chambers / Narrated by Rachel Dulude

    The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet

    “This gripping, diverse novel, set well after Earth's residents have scattered to Mars, other planets, and itinerant spacecraft, is as scientifically and sociopolitically plausible as any science fiction I've ever read or listened to. The characters, from a variety of alien species along with AI, have wide-ranging journeys that speak to our current reality and to issues of immigration, xenophobia, colonization, economic class, technological advancement, environmentalism, and more. The members of one species are all born female and becomes male later on, of another all use "they" pronouns, and of another are free with their touch and affection and find amusement in human hangups about touch. In the midst of all this complex representation emerges a story that stands alone as cohesive, meaningful, and powerful.”

    A Seat at the Table Books image Emily, A Seat at the Table Books
  31. On Earth We're Briefly Gorgeous

    “Written as a letter from son to mother, Ocean Vuong's On Earth We're Briefly Gorgeous is desolately beautiful. Each carefully crafted sentence builds upon the last, a momentum that carries you through a hundred pages before you remember to take a breath. Bleak, brilliant, it is the book other books will be compared to for years. Honestly, I would have been fine if it had been the last book I ever read.”

    Cody image Cody, Book Culture, @thecodystuart
  32. This Is How You Lose The Time War

    “Agents for opposite sides of a war without an end or beginning find themselves drawn to one another. It starts as a little deadly competition, but it quickly becomes clear that it's more than just fascination. Amal El-Mohtar and Max Gladstone work together like steak and a fine wine. Some of the most beautiful prose, and two of the most complex characters ever written, This is How You Lose the Time War is a tragic love story wrapped in science fiction. Emily Woo Zeller and Cynthia Farrell narrate with such emotion that the listener believes every word they say. This is one of my favorite Audiobooks of all time.”

    Cavalier House Books image Sophie, Cavalier House Books
  33. My Dark Vanessa

    “In this gripping debut novel, a teenage girl falls into an affair with her English teacher, who is 30 years her senior. The voice of Vanessa, the narrator, is unparalleled in its honesty, and her emotions are fiercely conveyed with unrelenting realness. This novel is a timely and important read, sometimes difficult, but ultimately an unforgettable experience. You will be left astonished and transformed. Vanessa is formidable and so is her story; you won’t be able to put down this powerhouse of a novel.”

    Luisa Barbano image Luisa Barbano, Oblong Books & Music
  34. The #1 New York Times Bestseller

    Includes six new songs by Jessica Simpson, available exclusively in the Open Book audiobook.

    Performed by the author featuring her music throughout.

    Jessica reveals for the first time her inner monologue and most intimate struggles. Guided by the journals she's kept since age fifteen, and brimming with her unique... Read More »

  35. By Richard Powers / Narrated by Suzanne Toren

    The Overstory

    “Do you love trees? Probably not as much as Richard Powers does! This books weaves together the converging stories of nine characters, but they really function as a means to probe the perspective of the trees themselves. With lyrical prose and amazing stories of naturalist history, this is an epic of environmental literature.”

    Avid Bookshop image David, Avid Bookshop
  36. By Erin Morgenstern / Narrated by Jim Dale

    The Night Circus

    “Scintillating, ethereal, and utterly captivating. And with narration by Jim Dale, who could say no? Morgenstern writes in sparkling prose, slowly weaving tapestries that come together in beautiful, unexpected ways, though when you look back, the stage had been set from the beginning. The Night Circus is a beautiful tale of being open to the magic in the world and choosing your own path through it all. Now if only I knew where the Cirque was making its next stop. Perhaps I'll email the proprietor... ”

    Second Star to the Right image Britt, Second Star to the Right
  37. Calypso

    “We, your concerned booksellers, want to make sure you are in tip-top reading shape before David Sedaris visits Main Street Books. Much like a runner must train for a marathon, you must exercise your sense of humor, so as not to pull something in David's presence. Tune up your funny bone with Me Talk Pretty One Day, Naked, When You Are Engulfed in Flames, or any of the other great Sedaris collections on Libro.fm. ”

    Main Street Books Davidson image Eleanor, Main Street Books Davidson
  38. If you enjoyed A Really Good Day, then you’ll love How to Change Your Mind.

    “Take an over-medicated, moody, middle-aged mother of four, add a month of experimental microdosing with LSD and it makes for A Really Good Day by Ayelet Waldman. This mesmerizing memoir of mental exploration tackles the taboo topic of drug use in our society, the frightening rise of prescription pills and the devastating addictions developing during the War on Drugs. A rollicking ride through the realm of self-realization, Waldman’s creative quest for sanity is painfully honest, hysterically funny and deeply human. I loved it!”

    McLean & Eakin Booksellers image Kristin, McLean & Eakin Booksellers
  39. Long Bright River

    “This story’s power comes not just from its beautiful writing but the reality of its characters and the incisive nature of its setting. Liz Moore has created a masterpiece that exposes the opioid epidemic in Philadelphia, highlighting the vulnerability of its victims and the sheer scope of suffering it causes. From the first page, when the murder mystery begins, readers will suffer and rejoice with the novel’s oh-so-human characters. The power of this story is a fire that will linger for a long time.”

    Hilary Kotecki image Hilary Kotecki, The Doylestown & Lahaska Bookshops
  40. Normal People

    “What a treat to discover Sally Rooney! This novel stands out shining from the current onslaught of mediocre prose and less-than-suspenseful thriller plots. Normal People is the story of a relationship between two high school classmates in a small town in Ireland, and how it changes over time, through their last year of college in Dublin. Rooney’s spare and brilliant writing illuminates her insight and makes the unfolding of these two personalities completely compelling.”

    Georgiana Dix Blomberg image Georgiana Dix Blomberg, Magnolia's Bookstore
  41. By N. K. Jemisin / Narrated by Robin Miles

    The Fifth Season

    “The Fifth Season is an amazing, dark, and gripping work that will hook you from the first sentence. I cannot express to you how much this book stunned me. Robin's narration is well paced and engaging. While I wish this was a book for everyone to listen to, it isn't; destruction, trauma, and rage follow the women and girls who tell their stories. This book is about the end of the world, that you actually don't want to stop reading.”

    Once Upon A Time image Jessica, Once Upon A Time
  42. The Witches Are Coming

    “ I struggle to write a review of Lindy West's work without resorting to simplistic three syllable sentences like "she's awesome," or, "she's the best." Maybe it's because she makes it look so very easy. She says everything I'm always thinking: about feminism, about politics, about our image-obsessed culture. And she does it with irrefutable logic, dazzling sentences, and an utterly fierce and funny sensibility. She's...(sigh) perfect.”

    The Book Table image Rachel, The Book Table
  43. "A glorious fantasy."--Neil Gaiman
    Three-time Hugo Award-winning and New York Times bestselling author N.K. Jemisin crafts her most incredible novel yet, a story of culture, identity, magic, and myths in contemporary New York City.
    In Manhattan, a young grad student gets off the train and realizes he doesn't remember who he is, where he's... Read More »

  44. 2014 National Book Award Finalist

    A New York Times Bestseller


    An audacious, darkly glittering novel set in the eerie days of civilization’s collapse, Station Eleven tells the spellbinding story of a Hollywood star, his would-be savior, and a nomadic group of actors roaming the scattered outposts of the Great Lakes region, risking everything for... Read More »

  45. Severance

    “A disaffected young woman just scraping by in the big city. A rag-tag group of survivors on a journey through a post-apocalyptic landscape. These are familiar tropes in contemporary fiction (albeit not usually in the same novel). But with Ling Ma's steely-eyed, wry treatment, they grow into something far more complex. In an alternate 2011, Shen Fever, a global pandemic, causes "a fatal loss of consciousness" in those infected. "The Fevered" forget to eat or drink or sleep, but instead get caught in a seeming zombie-like loop of muscle memory: a housewife sets the table for dinner over and over again; a taxi driver drives around the city until he runs out of gas; a young woman tries on all of the clothes in her closet in an endless loop. This post-apocalyptic world is woven with flashbacks of pandemic-survivor Candace Chen's pre-apocalypse life in New York, where a job she doesn't even like becomes the anchor of her identity such that she will seemingly do anything in order to continue to do it, even after she's the last survivor at her company. The question that lingers: is the rote repetition of our lives the very essence of who we are? And how far will we go to preserve that facade of living? Severance is a beautifully spare and wryly funny novel, by a huge new talent. ”

    The Book Table image Rachel, The Book Table
  46. Ninth House

    “The charter of the Leahy house is to manage and police the secret houses of the veil on the campus of Yale University. When a murder is connected to the magical activities of the houses, Galaxy Stern, Alex, the newest member of the Ninth House must find out what happened even if it means losing her place at Yale or her life. Ninth House grips you from the beginning and Alex is a wonderfully crafted edgy protagonist with deep scars. In the pretentious ivy league world Alex tenaciously pursues evil through unexpected twists and turns. If you like mystery and magic this is for you!”

    Avid Bookshop image Ellen, Avid Bookshop
  47. Sapiens

    “I don't own many books. I read books and give them away. However, I will NOT be giving away my copy of Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind. It's a keeper! Sapiens was an intense read for me. I found myself taking breaks every dozen pages or so. Not because I was bored - just the opposite. I needed time to let the author's perspective on the history of our species (you, me, us!) sink in. Yuval Noah Harari is irreverent at times and makes mind-blowing assertions in his book. You may not agree with all of his theories, but what he claims will make you see yourself as the animal you are in a refreshing new light. It's even possible that after you read Sapiens your view of the human condition will have shifted dramatically. Superbly translated from the original Hebrew into English by the author himself, Sapiens is accessible to readers of all types of non-fiction and fiction alike.”

    The Bookloft image Catherine, The Bookloft
  48. A Gentleman in Moscow

    “Through Count Alexander Ilyich Rostov's ordinary encounters and activities within the bounds of the four walls of post-revolutionary Moscow's Metropol Hotel, where he is under house arrest, Towles deftly guides readers across a century of Russian history, from the Bolshevik uprising to the dawn of the nuclear age under Krushchev. Grandiloquent language and drama reminiscent of Tolstoy gradually give way to action and tradecraft suggestive of le Carre in this lovely and entertaining tale of one man's determination to maintain his dignity and passion for life, even after being stripped of his title, belongings, and freedom. Reading A Gentleman in Moscow is pure pleasure!”

    The Vermont Book Shop image Becky Dayton, The Vermont Book Shop
  49. The Authenticity Project

    “Lovely story with great characters! Light enough, but still moving. I'm a little sad to be finished with it, honestly, and I'm already hoping for a sequel. Are you listening Penguin Random House? Sequel, please!”

    A Little Bookish image Miranda, A Little Bookish
  50. One of the New York Times 10 Best Books of the Year

    BEST NONFICTION BOOK OF THE YEAR - TIME MAGAZINE

    ONE OF THE BEST 10 BOOKS OF THE YEAR - WASHINGTON POST

    NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

    NATIONAL BOOK CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD FINALIST

    WINNER OF THE ORWELL PRIZE

    LONGLISTED FOR THE NATIONAL BOOK AWARD 

    "Masked intruders dragged Jean McConville, a 38-year-old...
    Read More »

  51. By Hilary Mantel / Narrated by Simon Slater

    In the ruthless arena of King Henry VIII's court, only one man dares to gamble his life to win the king's favor and ascend to the heights of political power

    England in the 1520s is a heartbeat from disaster. If the king dies without a male heir, the country could be destroyed by civil war. Henry VIII wants to annul his marriage of twenty years,... Read More »

  52. Lincoln in the Bardo

    “Saunders' first novel has a steep entry curve. It's not a novel that reveals itself quickly and easily, but if you give it your attention, if you burrow deep into the book, you'll be eminently rewarded. There is a richness and depth of humanity here. There is the strange and wonderful. There is love and grief and mystery all brought together in the story of Abraham Lincoln's dead son, the Civil War, and what may happen to us all after we leave the mortal coil. It's a beautiful and moving book that will stay with you for a long, long while.”

    University Book Store image Jason Vanhee, University Book Store
  53. Based on the extraordinary life of National Book Award-winning author Louise Erdrich’s grandfather who worked as a night watchman and carried the fight against Native dispossession from rural North Dakota all the way to Washington, D.C., this powerful novel explores themes of love and death with lightness and gravity and unfolds with the elegant... Read More »

  54. A new rip-roaring essay collection from the smart, edgy, hilarious, unabashedly raunchy, and bestselling Samantha Irby.

    Irby is forty, and increasingly uncomfortable in her own skin despite what Inspirational Instagram Infographics have promised her. She has left her job as a receptionist at a veterinary clinic, has published successful books and... Read More »

  55. The Library Book

    “There is no one better at investigating the fascinating stories hiding in plain sight than Susan Orlean. The vivid descriptions of the fire that engulfed the Los Angeles Central Library in 1986 are burnished by the meticulous research she did on the history of libraries and on the shocking event that resulted in the destruction and damage of over one million books. The mystery of who would start such a fire is woven between stories of eccentric librarians and the transformation of Los Angeles in the 20th century. From memories of the blissful hours spent in the library of her youth to the historical significance of these repositories of our past, Orlean has crafted a love letter to the importance of the written word and those who devote their lives to its preservation.”

    Book Passage image Luisa Smith, Book Passage
  56. A Good Neighborhood

    “Great option for those looking to examine the blend between liberal thoughts in theory and thoughts in reality. What do you believe in theory and what do you find when it's actually who your son or daughter is dating. When it's something in your life -- do you care about the environment in theory or when it's a tree in your backyard. Good, easy read with some lovely characters.”

    Little Joe's Coffee and Books image Gretchen, Little Joe's Coffee and Books
  57. By Min Jin Lee / Narrated by Allison Hiroto

    Pachinko (National Book Award Finalist)

    “A father's gentle nature, a mother's sacrifice, a daughter's trust, and a son's determination are the cornerstones of this grand, multilayered saga. Pachinko follows one family through an ever-changing cultural landscape, from 1910 Korea to 1989 Japan. As the bonds of family are put to the test in the harsh realities of their world, Sunja and those she holds dear manage to carve themselves a place to call home with hard work, self sacrifice, and a little kimchi. Through it all is a message about love, faith, and the deep-rooted bonds of family. Min Jin Lee gives us a phenomenal story about one family's struggle that resonates with us today. It will take hold of you and not let go!”

    Jennifer Steele image Jennifer Steele, Boswell Book Company
  58. Uncanny Valley

    “Like Joan Didion or Renata Adler, Ben Lerner or Sally Rooney, Anna Wiener writes with dead-on specificity, scalpel-sharp analysis, deep sensitivity, and an eye for the absurd. She headed west into the modern gold rush that is the tech boom and now returns with gleaming ingots of insight, weaving tales of a strange land where boy-CEOs ride ripsticks and hoover up your data. An essential and very human look at the forces shaping who we are and how we behave.”

    Sam MacLaughlin image Sam MacLaughlin, McNally Jackson Williamsburg
  59. Children of Blood and Bone

    “Children of Blood & Bone, is a story told in a world where magic no longer exists. Years ago, this was not the case. Once, magic and the Gods were celebrated. Now, Diviners (those with Maji blood, but no magic) are treated poorly, and all the Maji have been killed. One of those including our main protagonist, Zélie’s, mother. Determined to find a way to bring back magic, Zélie, along with her brother Tzain, and Orïsha’s only princess, Amari (gone rogue), set out on a quest against all odds. Told from Zélie, Amari and Amari’s brother and crown prince, Inan’s viewpoints, Tomi Adeyemi weaves together a tale so beautifully and tragically relevant, it will leave you craving for answers and more.”

    Vroman's Bookstore image Jen, Vroman's Bookstore
  60. The Library of Lost and Found

    “This sweet little novel is exactly what you need on a cold winter night. Curl up with an eccentric part-time librarian who just wants to be useful as she discovers herself and her own voice. Living most of her adult life in the remains of her family home, largely untouched since the death of her parents, surrounded by tasks she has taken on to keep busy and help the entire town, Martha is empty and lost. But she discovers a mysterious book and embarks on a quest that upends her entire life and brings her closer to herself and her family. A perfect audio book for that post-holiday slump or as a balm during a busy time of life. Reminds us that the connections we form are the most important thing and worth tending.”

    Books & Company image Genavieve, Books & Company
  61. A Long Petal of the Sea

    “Isabel Allende’s latest novel couldn’t come at a better time for American readers heading into an election season. With immigration and desperate people seeking asylum as its central narrative thread, the novel reminds us of the uncanny resiliency of the human spirit and the power of love — both of others and of country — to restore and heal. From his awe-inspiring feat in the novel’s opening pages to his persistence in the face of a lifetime of adversity, cardiologist Victor Dalmau will live long and well in readers’ minds.”

    Raven Book Store image Kelly Barth, Raven Book Store
  62. My Sister, the Serial Killer

    My Sister, the Serial Killer is one of the best books to come along in quite a while — fast, funny, and completely engrossing. Oyinkan Braithwaite offers up a tale of Nigerian sisters Ayoola, a beautiful and sociopathic serial killer who destroys boyfriends, aware that all they ever want her for is her appearance, and Korede, a nurse whose average looks leave her continually passed up in preference for Ayoola. Still, taciturn and devoted Korede works hard to cover up her charming sister’s crimes. What will happen when they both fall for the same guy? At once a page-turner and a perversely righteous tale about the emptiness of physical beauty and the superficiality of being charmed by it, My Sister, the Serial Killer is entertaining, provoking, and utterly fascinating!”

    Bookbug image Sarah Sorensen, Bookbug
  63. Evvie Drake Starts Over

    “Evvie Drake is young and newly widowed, but no one knows that on the day her husband died, she had finally worked up the nerve to leave him. Dean Tenney is a major league baseball pitcher who has inexplicably lost the talent that made him a star. When Dean moves to Evvie’s small town to escape the humiliating sports headlines, their friendship proves to be just what both of them need. This is an absolute treasure of a novel — big-hearted, funny, sweet, and utterly satisfying. I cannot wait to sell this charming gem.”

    East City Bookshop image Emilie Sommer, East City Bookshop
  64. The Lager Queen of Minnesota

    “Stradal brings the heart here with characters you will really enjoy. They face the future with difficulty, courage and bravery. The story of the three determined women using what they know, baking pies and making beer, help them succeed. P.S. You don’t have to like pies or beer to savor this book.”

    HearthFire Books and Treats image Mollie, HearthFire Books and Treats
  65. Inheritance

    “Who are we? Does who we think we are change when we learn a family secret that alters the source of our identity? Shapiro has explored issues of identity in her previous memoirs, but in her latest she applies her signature candor and heart to a riveting, provocative, and inspiring genealogical mystery and journey of discovery.”

    R.J. Julia Booksellers image Roxanne Coady, R.J. Julia Booksellers
  66. From the New York Times bestselling author behind the “joyful, warm, touching” (Jasmine Guillory, New York Times bestselling author) The Unhoneymooners comes a delightfully charming love story about what happens when two assistants tasked with keeping a rocky relationship from explosion start to feel sparks of their own.

    Carey Douglas has worked... Read More »

  67. Stay Sexy & Don't Get Murdered

    “Karen Kilgariff and Georgia Hardstark bring the breeziness of their popular podcast My Favorite Murder to print in this collection of life hacks and true confessions. Alternately hilarious and wise, the two play off each other with the abandon of old college buddies. Fans of The Life-Changing Magic of Not Giving a F*ck will find much to enjoy here. While the book will leave you in stitches, the advice the pair doles out is solid and bankable. The book should be in every college freshman’s backpack as they leave for school.”

    Mac's Back-Books image Grace Harper, Mac's Back-Books
  68. We Ride Upon Sticks

    “This is such a fun romp! It has everything you could possibly want in a book: field hockey, witches, and ’80s bangs that have literally taken on a life of their own. Set in Salem in the 1980s, we follow a group of high school field hockey players as they struggle with their new dark powers and attempt to end their losing streak. One of the strangest, most satisfying books I have read in a long time!”

    Hillary Smith image Hillary Smith, Copperfield's Books Calistoga
  69. Disappearing Earth

    “Julia Phillips is an author to watch. She beautifully transports us to a region of the world that I had never heard of and now can’t stop thinking about. The stories of the women there—their family dynamics, their hopes and fears, the economic and cultural divide of various communities—tell a moving story about this place in a moment in time, but ultimately about the universal struggle of women living with the expectations placed on them. A remarkable debut.”

    Bookshop Santa Cruz image Casey Coonerty, Bookshop Santa Cruz
  70. By Susan Cain / Narrated by Kathe Mazur

    NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • Experience the book that started the quiet revolution
     
    “A smart, lively book about the value of silence and solitude.”—Daniel Gilbert, author of Stumbling on Happiness
     
    NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY People • O: The Oprah Magazine • Christian Science Monitor • Inc. • Library Journal • Kirkus Reviews
     
    At... Read More »

  71. Less (Winner of the Pulitzer Prize)

    “When novelist Arthur Less learns that his longtime boyfriend is marrying another man, he accepts every invitation he's received and travels around the world. This novel of a man facing 50 and looking back at his life and love is an utter delight.”

    Blue Willow Bookshop image Cathy, Blue Willow Bookshop
  72. The Girl with the Louding Voice

    “This year is overflowing with phenomenal debuts — including this one from Abi Daré. It tells the story of Adunni, a young girl in Nigeria whose dreams and ambition focus in on one thing: education. In a city where girls like her are looked down upon and considered unworthy, she comes to find that change can begin with even the smallest of voices. This story is the kind that makes you itch: you’ll ache for Adunni, bristle at the people who treat her so unjustly, and yearn for her to succeed. This is a stunning, important, and fascinating first novel.”

    Lindsay Howard image Lindsay Howard, Lark and Owl Booksellers
  73. In the Dream House

    “Welcome to the Dream House in this daring new kind of memoir that defies boundaries and boldly discards the conventions of genre. Inside, Carmen Maria Machado bares her soul in all of its pain and beauty, offering an intimate and profoundly vulnerable look at her own life, love, and sexuality. Machado has a gift for exposing the raw nerves and small miracles lurking beneath the surface of our daily lives. Her words move with a strange kind of urgency, surreal and yet true, like late-night phone calls when the rest of the world is asleep. I didn’t feel like I was reading a book so much as observing a person’s innermost thoughts. In the Dream House is a unique and extraordinary book.”

    Changing Hands image Jason Foose, Changing Hands
  74. Winner of the Audiophile Magazine Earphones Award.

    The classic collaboration from the internationally bestselling authors Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett, soon to be an original series starring Michael Sheen and David Tennant.

    "Good Omens . . . is something like what would have happened if Thomas Pynchon, Tom Robbins and Don DeLillo had... Read More »

  75. Universally acclaimed, rapturously reviewed, winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award for autobiography, and an instant New York Times bestseller, Chanel Miller's breathtaking memoir "gives readers the privilege of knowing her not just as Emily Doe, but as Chanel Miller the writer, the artist, the survivor, the fighter." (The Wrap).

    "I...
    Read More »

  76. Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine

    “Eleanor Oliphant has quickly become one of my favorite fictional characters, and this novel one of my favorite books. Eleanor is completely original and the right kind of weird. Her life and her past, combined with such kindhearted characters, made for a compulsively readable, heartwarming story that I did not want to put down. I can't wait for this book to come out so many more can fall in love with Eleanor. Highly, highly recommended.”

    Copperfield's Books image Kaitlin Smith, Copperfield's Books
  77. The Body

    “At home while peeling wallpaper or making diner—or just closing my eyes for a while—a non-fiction audio book is a perfect companion, especially if it’s teaching me something as well as being entertaining. The Body: A Guide For Occupants by Bill Bryson, narrated by Bill Bryson, is exactly that kind of book. Bryson’s voice is genial, sometimes humble, and yet informative and authoritative, and I was pleased that he choice to narrate it. And the subject is me! Well, sort of. But what could be more compelling than learning about this body that has taken care of me for, well, many years now. And even the insights that might not relate to me at this moment are fascinating. I kept thinking about my friends and how this book could help me to better understand their aches and pains and medical conditions. And, maybe most importantly, by listening to this book I became amazed at the idea that these bodies of ours do so much to keep us healthy and alive—and to understand how we should be helping our bodies to do so. I’d love to quote all the facts I’ve learned—such as information about viruses, and the odd facts that seem unbelievable, such as the Anton-Babinski syndrome, where people who are blind refuse to believe it—but that’s why you should listen to this book, to find these gems for yourself.”

    Loganberry Books image Sarah, Loganberry Books
  78. #1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

    WINNER OF THE BOOKER PRIZE

    The Testaments is a modern masterpiece, a powerful novel that can be read on its own or as a companion to Margaret Atwood’s classic, The Handmaid’s Tale.


    More than fifteen years after the events of The Handmaid's Tale, the theocratic regime of the Republic of Gilead maintains its grip on... Read More »

  79. The Mercies

    “A chilling and captivating book taking place in a Norwegian village in the 1670s, The Mercies is a story of resilience. It follows Maren, who watched as all the village men died in a storm and has had to find a way to survive those losses, and Ursa, the daughter of a merchant who was married off to a witch hunter before being brought north. When their paths cross, both women’s lives are changed forever. This beautifully written story left me chilled. It is not often that I have to put down a book, but there were several times I had to walk away from this one to just sit and think about it. A must-read!”

    Trident Booksellers and Cafe image Katherine Nazzaro, Trident Booksellers and Cafe
  80. NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • One juror changed the verdict. What if she was wrong? From the Academy Award–winning screenwriter of The Imitation Game and bestselling author of The Last Days of Night. . . .
     
    An ID Book Club Selection • “Exhilarating . . . a fiendishly slippery game of cat-and-mouse suspense and a provocative, urgent inquiry into... Read More »

  81. "The many listeners enthralled by the earlier two volumes in Hilary Mantel's Wolf Hall trilogy will find all their expectations met in this final installment... Here is a narrative achievement of the highest order." — AudioFile Magazine, Earphones Award winner

    This program is read by Ben Miles, who played Thomas Cromwell in the Royal Shakespeare... Read More »

  82. "If Hood Feminism is a searing indictment of mainstream feminism, it is also an invitation. . . . [Kendall] offers guidance for how we can all do better."--NPR.org

    "A rousing call to action for today's feminists. It should be required reading for everyone."--Gabrielle Union, author of We're Going to Need More Wine

    A potent and electrifying...
    Read More »

  83. Red, White & Royal Blue

    “Fresh, irreverent, and funny, Red, White & Royal Blue is a delight and a treasure. With subtle jabs, Casey McQuiston pokes fun at both the public face of the British monarchy as well as the back-door politicking that dominates the U.S. political scene. The story follows the self-centered Alex Claremont-Diaz (America’s First Son) and his interactions with British Prince Henry of Wales. As hostility increases between two political scions forced into a sham friendship, we see the framework of political destiny and duty begin to fray. Little by little, hostility turns to something else entirely. This is a story about happiness — and, more importantly, honesty — for those who live their lives in the public eye.”

    The Book Cellar image Todd Ketcham, The Book Cellar
  84. The Song of Achilles

    “This is one of the best books I've ever read. Do your heart a favor and read this beautiful, tender, heartbreaking book.”

    Mysterious Galaxy Books image Kelly, Mysterious Galaxy Books
  85. By Demi Moore / Narrated by Demi Moore

    Inside Out

    “Demi Moore's memoir is riveting. She begins the book describing her desperately sad childhood. Both parents suffer from alcoholism and the demons that accompany the disease. Her father commits suicide in his thirties. As a result, Demi enters into many failed romances with men who are cut from the same cloth as her father. Demi candidly describes her break into show business and the many famous people that she meets along the way. She covers her own substance abuse issues with raw candor. Demi does not miss a beat in her descriptions of both high profile marriages. Listening to Demi's words in her own voice was a special treat. It is the story of hard work and resilience. I highly recommend it.”

    Buttonwood Books and Toys image Melinda, Buttonwood Books and Toys
  86. Now a Netflix original series!
    Geralt the Witcher -- revered and hated -- holds the line against the monsters plaguing humanity in this collection of adventures in the NYT bestselling series that inspired the blockbuster video games.
    Geralt is a Witcher, a man whose magic powers, enhanced by long training and a mysterious elixir, have made... Read More »

  87. By Tamsyn Muir / Narrated by Moira Quirk

    Gideon the Ninth

    “This is everything I wanted in a book and more. Gideon is likable but flawed, Harrow is horrible and unforgettable, and the prose occasionally turns hauntingly beautiful. The narration helps make a complex world become real and the characters friends you may or may not want to invite over to dinner. It depends on whether your folks are there.”

    Page 158 Books image Jenny, Page 158 Books
  88. Killers of the Flower Moon

    “One of the most horrific chapters in American history is brought back to the national consciousness with alarming detail in Killers of the Flower Moon. After the Osage Indian Nation strikes oil, its members become rich beyond their wildest dreams, only to encounter a vast and murderous conspiracy that will leave more than 60 members of the nation dead. David Grann reconstructs those murders and the subsequent investigations with astonishing care and reveals the depths of a conspiracy that stretched from Oklahoma to Washington, D.C. This story will certainly be one of the most important books of 2017.”

    Anderson's Bookshop image Steven Shonder, Anderson's Bookshop
  89. As a botanist and professor of plant ecology, Robin Wall Kimmerer has spent a career learning how to ask questions of nature using the tools of science. As a Potawatomi woman, she learned from elders, family, and history that the Potawatomi, as well as a majority of other cultures indigenous to this land, consider plants and animals to be our... Read More »

  90. There There

    “There There is the kind of book that grabs you from the start and doesn’t let go, even after you’ve turned the last page. It is a work of fiction, but every word of it feels true. Tommy Orange writes with a palpable anger and pain, telling the history of a cultural trauma handed down through generations in the blood and bones and stories of individual lives. He also writes with incredible heart and humor, infusing his characters with a tangible humanity and moments of joy even as they are headed toward tragedy. There There has claimed a permanent spot in my heart despite having broken it, or maybe because it did. I think this may be the best book I’ve ever read.”

    Changing Hands image Heather Weldon, Changing Hands
  91. By J.R.R. Tolkien / Narrated by Rob Inglis

    Inspired by The Hobbit, and begun in 1937, The Lord of the Rings is a trilogy that Tolkien created to provide "the necessary background of history for Elvish tongues." From these academic aspirations was born one of the most popular and imaginative works in English literature. The Fellowship of the Ring, the first volume in the trilogy, tells of... Read More »

  92. "When I stop crying, I'm calling my mother immediately and making her read it." --Jodi Picoult

    "Comic lines as good as in any movie, and pathos as deep as in any novel" --Mike Birbiglia

    Bess Kalb, Emmy-nominated TV writer and New Yorker contributor, saved every voicemail her grandmother Bobby Bell ever left her. Bobby was a force--irrepressible,... Read More »

  93. Little Weirds

    “Magical, delightful and amusing book of daydreams with a cupful of nonsense.”

    HearthFire Books and Treats image Mollie, HearthFire Books and Treats
  94. Spinning Silver

    “Spinning Silver takes the bones of Rumpelstiltskin and turns it into a story about female agency and power. While the six person narrative structure could be a bit tricky to follow, narrator Lisa Flanagan brings Miryem, Wanda, and Irina to life and readers will soon be caught up in the magic Naomi Novik weaves.”

    Zenith Bookstore image Nikki, Zenith Bookstore
  95. The untold stories behind The Office, one of the most iconic television shows of the twenty-first century, told by its creators, writers, and actors
     
    When did you last hang out with Jim, Pam, Dwight, Michael, and the rest of Dunder Mifflin? It might have been back in 2013, when the series finale aired . . . or it might have been last night,... Read More »

  96. By Jenny Odell / Narrated by Rebecca Gibel

    A galvanizing critique of the forces vying for our attention—and our personal information—that redefines what we think of as productivity, reconnects us with the environment, and reveals all that we've been too distracted to see about ourselves and our world Nothing is harder to do these days than nothing. But in a world where our value is... Read More »

  97. Dear Edward

    “A stunning portrayal of what it means to be a survivor and the fine balance between surviving and actually finding the will to move forward from the shattered remains of your life. This is what 12-year-old Eddie — now known as Edward — must deal with as the sole survivor of a plane crash in which 191 people, including his immediate family, perished. Dear Edward is a novel that pierces you to the core with its depiction of grief, guilt, loneliness, and remorse, but through glimpses of hope, friendship, and kindness, shows how Edward slowly mends.”

    Lake Forest Book Store image Maxwell Gregory, Lake Forest Book Store
  98. In this whip-smart and timely novel from acclaimed author Kimmery Martin, two doctors travel a surprising path when they must choose between treating their patients and keeping their jobs.
     
    Georgia Brown’s profession as a urologist requires her to interact with plenty of naked men, but her romantic prospects have fizzled. The most important... Read More »

  99. Ask Again, Yes

    Ask Again, Yes is a compelling, heartbreaking, yet ultimately hopeful novel. Mary Beth Keane is incredibly talented; she does not sugar coat, instead giving readers a compulsively readable family drama. I did not expect to become so completely engrossed in these characters’ stories — two families whose lives become inextricably linked by young love and personal tragedy. Their myriad mistakes and attempts to atone beautifully demonstrate the power and grace found in forgiveness.”

    Page and Palette image Anderson McKean, Page and Palette
  100. An entertaining, humorous, and inspirational memoir by the founder and chief creative officer of the multimillion-dollar lifestyle brand ban.do, who “has become a hero among women (and likely some men too) who struggle with mental health (Forbes).”

    After graduating from college, Jen Gotch was living with her parents, heartbroken and lost, when... Read More »

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