Have a Gift or Promo Code? Get Started

Bestselling Audiobooks

The top 50 audiobooks on Libro.fm based on sales from our 1,000+ partner bookstore locations.

Last Updated •
  1. Educated

    “Raised by Mormon fundamentalists, mistrustful of the medical community while having never stepped foot in a classroom setting, Tara Westover's memoir, "Educated" is excruciatingly painful at times. From witnessing devastating destruction deep in the woods of Idaho to enduring an abusive bi-polar brother to becoming ostracized by her survivalist parents for her beliefs, Tara's tale of self-discovery will totally bring you to tears. Torrents of them. For fans of "The Glass Castle" by Jeannette Walls and "Hillbilly Elegy" by J.D. Vance, except much more dysfunctional, "Educated" will leave you thanking your lucky stars you weren't raised a Westover. Read by Julia Whelan, this audiobook is perfect for recent graduates, educators and everyone concerned about the state of our country. I highly recommend!”

    McLean & Eakin Booksellers image Kristin, McLean & Eakin Booksellers
  2. Where the Crawdads Sing

    “This first novel by nature writer Delia Owens has something for everyone. Fans of poetry, natural history, murder mysteries, southern food, and romance will be caught up in the deeply moving prose and memorable characters. Plus, the narrator adds in the North Carolina accents, too!”

    Inklings Bookshop image Amy, Inklings Bookshop
  3. Circe

    “This sweeping tale of the gods and heroes of Greek mythology as seen through the eyes of a minor goddess had me from the first chapter. I listened to this as an audiobook from our audio vendor, Libro.fm. The brilliant narrator was the 29-year-old Welsh film actress, Perdita Weeks.”

    Changing Hands image Bob, Changing Hands
  4. Becoming

    “I adore our former president and I miss him. Yet I cannot help but be ecstatic that Michelle is coming out with a book about her own life so that I can learn more about this powerful, intelligent, and singularly awesome woman. Barack would be the first to say that his wife is a superstar, and I can’t wait to get my hands on Becoming to read about her in her own words.”

    Bookshop Santa Cruz image Jax, Bookshop Santa Cruz
  5. Daisy Jones & The Six

    “Written as an oral history chronicling the astronomic rise and fall of a Fleetwood Mac-esque rock band in the late '70s, DAISY JONES & THE SIX is a gorgeous, dishy, and profound book that I devoured in something like two days. The story races like gangbusters and cuts straight to the hearts and souls of the superbly-drawn characters, who all have a lot to say about music, creativity, fame, family, love, collaboration, and (of course) sex, drugs, and rock 'n' roll. Definitely one of my favorite books of the year so far!”

    One More Page image Rebecca, One More Page
  6. SHORTLISTED FOR THE BOOKER PRIZE

    Margaret Atwood's dystopian masterpiece, The Handmaid's Tale, has become a modern classic—and now she brings the iconic story to a dramatic conclusion in this riveting sequel.


    More than fifteen years after the events of The Handmaid's Tale, the theocratic regime of the Republic of Gilead maintains its grip on... Read More »

  7. City of Girls

    City of Girls is a champagne cocktail, a tonic for anything that ails you, and the summer read you can’t miss! Vivian Morris, an upper-class, 19-year-old college dropout, finds herself in the chaotic New York City theater world of the 1940s. What ensues is a story full of sex, glamour, and witty one-liners that spans decades. All those who led a heedless youth or wish they had will fall for this book about growing into the person you’ve always wanted to be. Gilbert has written a glittering piece of fiction that subtly delivers wisdom about the nature of human connection and leaves the reader braver, freer, and, at least for the moment, happier.”

    Books & Books image Caroline McGregor, Books & Books
  8. Talking to Strangers

    “Gladwell's synthesis of famous news clips, infamous moments in history, and a collection of behavioral studies is uncannily fascinating. I found myself at turns nodding along with his points and shaking my head incredulously. While I was reading, I would over-analyze conversations and encounters I had with strangers, and then laugh at myself for being so paranoid. I rose to the enraged defense of the victims of violent crimes he recounted in the book and was horrified to find myself possibly trying to understand with some of the behaviors of the perpetrators. In the end, I'm not sure I agree with everything Gladwell discussed. But then again, I don't think he set out to convince anyone of any particular thing. His goal was to answer what could have happened in the case of Sandra Bland and to peel back the layers to expose human behaviors and assumptions that could have possibly played a role in the incident. This was the first book by Gladwell that I've read and I look forward to exploring more of his work. This audiobook was particularly interesting. Gladwell narrated but integrated interview clips, news sound bites, and actor reenactments throughout the audio. At first jarring and a little worrisome, because I thought I wasn't going to understand the clips due to audio quality, it was an addition that I found myself enjoying and really added depth to the book's thematic goals. I definitely recommend this book! Especially the audiobook version.”

    Gottwals Books image Rebekah, Gottwals Books
  9. If you enjoyed The Woman in the Window, then you’ll love The Silent Patient.

    “The Silent Patient is a suspenseful story that reads like a Greek tragedy, bursting with unknowns and sprinkled with exciting twists. It is a brilliant novel written by a man that certainly knows how to write something gripping and dramatic, perfect for readers that liked 'The Woman in the Window". At the center of the story is the mystery that is Alicia Berenson, an incredibly gifted painter that was convicted of murdering her husband six years before the start of the book. According to those close to the Berensons, Alicia and Gabriel had a great marriage and were happy together. Then one day Gabriel was tied to a chair and shot five times in the face. Alicia was found standing over his dead body, his blood splattered on her, and the murder weapon had only her fingerprints; it was enough to arrest her for the murder of her husband of seven years. The media circled over this story not because of the actual crime, but because Alicia stayed silent throughout the trial, not even to speak up in her own defense, and has not uttered a word for the past six years. This not only made her case known nationally, but it landed her in Grove Psychiatric Hospital instead of prison. Years have passed and people have forgotten about Alicia Berenson, everyone except Theo Faber, a troubled psychotherapist that has been obsessed with her case since the very beginning and believes he can help her. When a position opens at the declining Grove Psychiatric Hospital, Theo quits his better-paying job and jumps at the chance to finally work with Alicia and get to the bottom of why she has remained silent for the past six years. It is the chance of a lifetime for him. Alex Michaelides is a talented screenwriter that was inspired by a post graduate course in psychotherapy and working part-time at a secure psychiatric unit, meaning that the writing and structure of this debut novel is brilliantly done, and the story is layered with reality. An excellent read!”

    McLean & Eakin Booksellers image Devin, McLean & Eakin Booksellers
  10. Calypso

    “We, your concerned booksellers, want to make sure you are in tip-top reading shape before David Sedaris visits Main Street Books. Much like a runner must train for a marathon, you must exercise your sense of humor, so as not to pull something in David's presence. Tune up your funny bone with Me Talk Pretty One Day, Naked, When You Are Engulfed in Flames, or any of the other great Sedaris collections on Libro.fm. ”

    Main Street Books Davidson image Eleanor, Main Street Books Davidson
  11. A Gentleman in Moscow

    “Through Count Alexander Ilyich Rostov's ordinary encounters and activities within the bounds of the four walls of post-revolutionary Moscow's Metropol Hotel, where he is under house arrest, Towles deftly guides readers across a century of Russian history, from the Bolshevik uprising to the dawn of the nuclear age under Krushchev. Grandiloquent language and drama reminiscent of Tolstoy gradually give way to action and tradecraft suggestive of le Carre in this lovely and entertaining tale of one man's determination to maintain his dignity and passion for life, even after being stripped of his title, belongings, and freedom. Reading A Gentleman in Moscow is pure pleasure!”

    The Vermont Book Shop image Becky Dayton, The Vermont Book Shop
  12. The Nickel Boys

    “A brilliant black boy, in the wrong car, meets the wrong cop. A for-profit penal system puts him in a reform school run by abusers, with a suspicious graveyard out back. What happens next is... a powerful arc bending toward justice? Colson Whitehead delivers a book about suffering that does not revel in suffering, a book about keeping soul in a broken world, a book that leaves the reader wanting the hero to embrace the person he has become.”

    The Haunted Bookshop image Nialle, The Haunted Bookshop
  13. There There

    “A stunning debut novel by an original voice. Twelve characters of Native American descent, interrelated by birth or chance, struggle with the competing forces of cultural history and modern urban existence. Their stories build separately before colliding powerfully in the book’s final pages at The Big Oakland Powwow. I was riveted.”

    Parnassus Books image Keltie, Parnassus Books
  14. Evvie Drake Starts Over

    “A delightful summer listen. Quick witted and sharp. A rom-com ready to take to the beach and be enjoyed!”

    HearthFire Books and Treats image Mollie, HearthFire Books and Treats
  15. On Earth We're Briefly Gorgeous

    “Alright 2019, this is the novel to beat. On Earth We’re Briefly Gorgeous is the rare novel that makes you experience reading in a slightly different way and shows you that, no matter how many books you’ve read, something new and uniquely beautiful can still be found. The novel takes the form of a letter written by the main character, Little Dog, to his mother — an immigrant from Vietnam who cannot read. The power of Vuong’s poetic writing shimmers with every paragraph, and each phrase is a carefully considered, emotional journey. Grappling with themes of identity, sexuality, addiction, violence, and finding your place in a world where you feel you don’t belong, this book already feels like a modern classic, destined to be read and talked about for years to come.”

    Bookmarks image Caleb Masters, Bookmarks
  16. The Secrets We Kept

    “This perfect historical novel is made of the most alluring ingredients. First, a divine and doomed love affair between Russian author Boris Pasternak and his muse and secretary, Olga Ivinskaya, a woman immortalized in Pasternak’s epic novel Doctor Zhivago, which was banned in Russia for more than 30 years. Second, two American women typists working for CIA and their forbidden love story in the midst of the Cold War and the witch hunt against homosexuals. Lara Prescott brilliantly portrays how a timeless novel like Doctor Zhivago can change course of history. After I finished reading The Secrets We Kept, I pressed the book against my chest, as if I could hear the lovers’ hearts still beating.”

    Aggie Zivaljevic image Aggie Zivaljevic, Kepler's Books
  17. The Library Book

    “There is no one better at investigating the fascinating stories hiding in plain sight than Susan Orlean. The vivid descriptions of the fire that engulfed the Los Angeles Central Library in 1986 are burnished by the meticulous research she did on the history of libraries and on the shocking event that resulted in the destruction and damage of over one million books. The mystery of who would start such a fire is woven between stories of eccentric librarians and the transformation of Los Angeles in the 20th century. From memories of the blissful hours spent in the library of her youth to the historical significance of these repositories of our past, Orlean has crafted a love letter to the importance of the written word and those who devote their lives to its preservation.”

    Book Passage image Luisa Smith, Book Passage
  18. The Turn of the Key

    “Ruth Ware is back and at her dazzling best with The Turn of the Key. This arresting tribute to Henry James set in modern-day remote Scotland posts a nanny in a ‘smart house’ with several recalcitrant children and a garden full of poisonous plants. Who do you trust when everyone seems to be hiding something? Readers will be reading with all the lights on as they race to the climactic ending to see just who is minding who in this engaging summer thriller.”

    Excelsior Bay Books image Pamela Klinger-Horn, Excelsior Bay Books
  19. The Lager Queen of Minnesota

    “Stradal brings the heart here with characters you will really enjoy. They face the future with difficulty, courage and bravery. The story of the three determined women using what they know, baking pies and making beer, help them succeed. P.S. You don’t have to like pies or beer to savor this book.”

    HearthFire Books and Treats image Mollie, HearthFire Books and Treats
  20. Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine

    “Eleanor Oliphant has quickly become one of my favorite fictional characters, and this novel one of my favorite books. Eleanor is completely original and the right kind of weird. Her life and her past, combined with such kindhearted characters, made for a compulsively readable, heartwarming story that I did not want to put down. I can't wait for this book to come out so many more can fall in love with Eleanor. Highly, highly recommended.”

    Copperfield's Books image Kaitlin Smith, Copperfield's Books
  21. The Ten Thousand Doors of January

    “This lovely, magical book is a coming-of-age story that blends the best qualities of the adventure stories of the early 20th century with some thoroughly modern sensibilities. January Scaller is an almost-orphan in the early 1900s, the unlikely ward of a rich collector of antiquities who employs her father to travel the world discovering treasures for his collections. When she discovers that she has the ability to open doors into other worlds, she finds a myriad of other civilizations, some beautiful, some terrifying, where the color of her skin and her gender don't matter the way they do in her own world. But her discovery threatens everything she believes about her life, her family and herself. The Ten Thousand Doors of January features beautiful writing and heart-stopping action. The perfect crossover novel, it will appeal equally to teens and adults alike. And January LaVoy's talented narration makes the story leap from the page. It's an immensely satisfying book!”

    Inklings Bookshop image Emily, Inklings Bookshop
  22. By Richard Powers / Narrated by Suzanne Toren

    The Overstory

    “Do you love trees? Probably not as much as Richard Powers does! This books weaves together the converging stories of nine characters, but they really function as a means to probe the perspective of the trees themselves. With lyrical prose and amazing stories of naturalist history, this is an epic of environmental literature.”

    Avid Bookshop image David, Avid Bookshop
  23. Unsheltered

    “A new Barbara Kingsolver novel is always a gift but this time her fictional journey feels even more powerful as she asks, “Can history help us navigate an impossible-looking future?” Unsheltered tells the stories of two families from different centuries living under the same roof, reeling from turbulence on both a national and a familial scale. Shelter is a basic survival need, but Kingsolver, being the literary artist she is, uses her characters to consider how we use physical, intellectual, and emotional shelters to navigate such troubles. The storms of life will surely rage but shelters can save our lives.”

    Bookshop Santa Cruz image Casey & Jenny, Bookshop Santa Cruz
  24. Ann Patchett, the New York Times bestselling author of Commonwealth and State of Wonder, returns with her most powerful novel to date: a richly moving story that explores the indelible bond between two siblings, the house of their childhood, and a past that will not let them go.

    “'Do you think it’s possible to ever see the past as it actually... Read More »

  25. By Celeste Ng / Narrated by Jennifer Lim

    Little Fires Everywhere

    “Little Fires Everywhere is a breathtaking novel about art, motherhood, and truth. Mia and her daughter, Pearl, move to the perfectly planned community of Shaker Heights as the last stop on their nomadic adventure, bringing some much-needed permanence to teenager Pearl's life. They both find friendship, but the connections they create with their landlord's family will soon change all of their lives. Impossible to put down or stop thinking about. A great read.”

    Stef Schmidt image Stef Schmidt, Water Street Books
  26. The Immortalists

    “The Immortalists by Chloe Benjamin is a unique story investigating fate and destiny. Four siblings visit a fortune teller whose talent is predicting the date of death for her clients. Does this knowledge at an impressionable age inform life decisions that render the prediction true or is it a hoax? You will get to know these siblings very well as Benjamin traces their lives and their choices. In the end—who really knows what determines when your time on this earth should come to an end? Intriguing.”

    Wellesley Books image Phyllis, Wellesley Books
  27. The Witch Elm

    “A burglary gone awry, a near-perfect life destroyed, a mind torn. Toby is caring for his dying uncle and finding himself again. When a skull is found in the wych elm, it seems that a decades-old murder may tear apart a family and Toby himself, as he tries to piece together what happened—and what he might have done. A haunting novel portrayed by a narrator unreliable to himself.”

    Bookshop Santa Cruz image Jocelyn, Bookshop Santa Cruz
  28. Never Have I Ever

    “When I saw the Joshilyn Jackson had written a thriller I wasn't sure what to think. But her step into this new genre was done so well it kept me on the edge of my seat and I couldn't stop listening.”

    Gottwals Books image Christy, Gottwals Books
  29. From #1 New York Times bestselling author Stephen King, the most riveting and unforgettable story of kids confronting evil since It—publishing just as the second part of It, the movie, lands in theaters.

    In the middle of the night, in a house on a quiet street in suburban Minneapolis, intruders silently murder Luke Ellis’s parents and load him... Read More »

  30. The Song of Achilles

    “This is one of the best books I've ever read. Do your heart a favor and read this beautiful, tender, heartbreaking book.”

    Mysterious Galaxy Books image Kelly, Mysterious Galaxy Books
  31. Three Women

    “I can’t recall the last time I’ve been reading a work of nonfiction and woken up excited purely by the fact that, today, I would get to read more. Compulsive and psychologically riveting, Three Women reads like a novel. I couldn’t keep from dog-earing its pages each time Taddeo perfectly expressed something I’d felt but never had the words for. In Sloane, Maggie, and Lina, I recognized aspects of myself — namely the desire for connection and for love. When three women tell their uncensored truth, they can liberate a nation. I feel deeply grateful to Lisa Taddeo for giving us this gift of raw authenticity.”

    Michaela Carter image Michaela Carter, Peregrine Book Company
  32. The Tattooist of Auschwitz

    “What a great easy read. We just finished it in our store book club and everyone enjoyed it. It’s a different perspective of the consentration camps from a survivors view. It shows humanity in survival mode and yet these two survivors still manage to find love in such a dark place.”

    The Book Center image Danielle, The Book Center
  33. Children of Blood and Bone

    “A sprawling fantasy teeming with deep and meaningful magic. One of the things I like most about this debut is that it raises very real and important issues of our time through multiple character's perspectives. No character is one-dimensional, and every character must learn from failure and introspection to become who they were meant to be.”

    Mysterious Galaxy Books image Kelly, Mysterious Galaxy Books
  34. "Robert Bathurst's intelligent narration captures every nuance, every emotion, and each of Louise Penny's subtle revelations about the unique, completely engaging residents of Three Pines." — AudioFile Magazine, Earphones Award winner

    Catastrophic spring flooding, blistering attacks in the media, and a mysterious disappearance greet Chief... Read More »

  35. The Long Call

    “I absolutely loved The Long Call. In this new mystery, Ann Cleeves introduces us to Inspector Matthew Venn, who embodies his diagram namesake as a character caught between his past and his future. A murder on a beach in Venn’s hometown on the English coast leads to a kidnapping, and as the pacing picks up, the suspects get ever closer to Venn’s personal life. An expertly plotted mystery that will keep readers guessing until the final pages.”

    Keith Vient image Keith Vient, Politics and Prose Bookstore
  36. Red, White & Royal Blue

    “Fresh, irreverent, and funny, Red, White & Royal Blue is a delight and a treasure. With subtle jabs, Casey McQuiston pokes fun at both the public face of the British monarchy as well as the back-door politicking that dominates the U.S. political scene. The story follows the self-centered Alex Claremont-Diaz (America’s First Son) and his interactions with British Prince Henry of Wales. As hostility increases between two political scions forced into a sham friendship, we see the framework of political destiny and duty begin to fray. Little by little, hostility turns to something else entirely. This is a story about happiness — and, more importantly, honesty — for those who live their lives in the public eye.”

    The Book Cellar image Todd Ketcham, The Book Cellar
  37. Black Leopard, Red Wolf

    “If I had to pick one word to describe this book, it would be feral. James creates a fantastical Africa that invokes the violence and brutality of the old world, but wraps it in delicate layers of myth and magic that make the reader want to cozy up to the savagery in order to get a better look. The characters add to the effect, as they are mysterious enough to entice and real enough to despise. The sense of displacement and lack of certainty enforces the message that nothing and nobody in this world can be trusted, not even the self. If people want to call this the African Game of Thrones, I won’t necessarily argue, but I will say that the Tracker and his frenemies would make any of the big baddies in Westeros run for cover with their tail cut off. ”

    Cellar Door Books image Linda Sherman-Nurick, Cellar Door Books
  38. Ask Again, Yes

    Ask Again, Yes is a compelling, heartbreaking, yet ultimately hopeful novel. Mary Beth Keane is incredibly talented; she does not sugar coat, instead giving readers a compulsively readable family drama. I did not expect to become so completely engrossed in these characters’ stories — two families whose lives become inextricably linked by young love and personal tragedy. Their myriad mistakes and attempts to atone beautifully demonstrate the power and grace found in forgiveness.”

    Page and Palette image Anderson McKean, Page and Palette
  39. Lincoln in the Bardo

    “Saunders' first novel has a steep entry curve. It's not a novel that reveals itself quickly and easily, but if you give it your attention, if you burrow deep into the book, you'll be eminently rewarded. There is a richness and depth of humanity here. There is the strange and wonderful. There is love and grief and mystery all brought together in the story of Abraham Lincoln's dead son, the Civil War, and what may happen to us all after we leave the mortal coil. It's a beautiful and moving book that will stay with you for a long, long while.”

    University Book Store image Jason Vanhee, University Book Store
  40. Mrs. Everything

    “"We lose ourselves along the way, but we find our way back." This quote came from the ending of Mrs. Everything. To me, those few words sum up the heart of the book. Mrs. Everything is the tale of two sisters. Jo, the eldest, is smart, athletic, opinionated, and questions her sexuality in adolescence. Bethie is sweet, talented, popular and also happens to be their mother's favorite. The girls share a strong bond which lasts a lifetime. The story takes place in the 1950s in Detroit. Through the years, the reader witnesses the sisters go through the death of their father, their first loves, their college years, and all the choices that the women make in their adult years. I listened to Mrs. Everything during two long car rides and I enjoyed every minute of it. In the end, it was difficult for me to bid goodbye to Jo and Bethie. I felt great love and admiration for both of them. There were two narrators that were an absolute delight to my ears. I highly recommend this thought-provoking book. It will spark great discussions in book clubs as well.”

    Buttonwood Books and Toys image Melinda, Buttonwood Books and Toys
  41. Killers of the Flower Moon

    “In "Killers of the Flower Moon", David Grann recounts the tragic tale of the Osage Indian Nations decimation and deceit at the hands of their government appointed guardians. Motivated by money, morally corrupt and masterfully manipulative, the true role of these benevolent benefactors, perpetrators of mass murder, is still a mystery today. Granns detailed, yet deeply disturbing detective work, back to the birth of the FBI and the rise of J. Edgar Hoover, unveils an unimaginable injustice overlooked for 85 years. Let’s not allow this atrocious act against the Osage to slip back into obscurity ever again.”

    McLean & Eakin Booksellers image Kristin, McLean & Eakin Booksellers
  42. Inland

    “Man, I could live my whole life inside this novel and be perfectly happy. Téa Obreht is the real thing. Inland has the stern gorgeousness of Blood Meridian, the cinematic perfection of Station Eleven, the fantasia-like atmosphere of Cloud Atlas, and the deep-heartedness of The Winter Soldier. This is the sort of novel that makes people want to get up and soldier on. I really loved this book.”

    Flyleaf Books image Erica Eisdorfer, Flyleaf Books
  43. Chances Are . . .

    “Richard Russo's novel of three chums reuniting five decades after graduation from their small liberal arts college captures all the significance of old friends reconnecting, but, more importantly, discovering truths about themselves. As always, Russo's dialect carries the story, and as an audio this is especially enjoyable. Covering the years from their shared experience of the Dec. 1, 1969 draft number lottery to the present (with its current political angst) history and Russo's inimitable character development combine in this satisfying novel.”

    Book Passage image Cheryl, Book Passage
  44. By Tamsyn Muir / Narrated by Moira Quirk

    Gideon the Ninth

    Gideon the Ninth is an epic science fantasy that if delivered into the hands of enough people will set the world on fire as it hasn’t been since The Hunger Games. Brilliance doesn’t come close to explaining Tamsyn Muir’s narrative where no single word is wasted or her engineering of a world with characters that end up belonging to you wholeheartedly even long after the last page. With fierce independence and hysterical wit, and laced with moments of pure heartbreaking tenderness and loyalty, Gideon and Harrow’s relationship simultaneously digs under your skin and tugs at your heartstrings. I cannot recommend this book highly enough.”

    Nichole Cousins image Nichole Cousins, Still North Books & Bar
  45. By Min Jin Lee / Narrated by Allison Hiroto

    Pachinko (National Book Award Finalist)

    “A father's gentle nature, a mother's sacrifice, a daughter's trust, and a son's determination are the cornerstones of this grand, multilayered saga. Pachinko follows one family through an ever-changing cultural landscape, from 1910 Korea to 1989 Japan. As the bonds of family are put to the test in the harsh realities of their world, Sunja and those she holds dear manage to carve themselves a place to call home with hard work, self sacrifice, and a little kimchi. Through it all is a message about love, faith, and the deep-rooted bonds of family. Min Jin Lee gives us a phenomenal story about one family's struggle that resonates with us today. It will take hold of you and not let go!”

    Jennifer Steele image Jennifer Steele, Boswell Book Company
  46. Hollow Kingdom

    “We need more heroes like S.T. — a foul-mouthed, idealistic, moral crow with unquenchable courage — and his sidekick, a befuddled bloodhound. Kira Jane Buxton speaks crow, gull, dog, housecat, and owl with such fluency and poetry that I could not put this book down. Her vision of the zombie apocalypse is a strange and wonderful journey I want to take again and again. I really can’t think of another current novel that conveys such humor, joy, sorrow, and hope so beautifully. Thank you for restoring my faith that this world may live on.”

    River Lights Bookstore image Dena Kurt, River Lights Bookstore
  47. Once Upon a River

    “Listening to "Once Upon A River" is a magical experience. Not only is the story one that takes you skillfully down different paths of individual character's lives and motivations but also the narrator of the story Juliet Stevenson skillfully envelopes every character's different rhythms with her voice in a wonderful way. I loved this storyline and look forward to reading Diane Setterfield's other books.”

    Tattered Cover image Suzie, Tattered Cover
  48. If you enjoyed A Really Good Day, then you’ll love How to Change Your Mind.

    “Take an over-medicated, moody, middle-aged mother of four, add a month of experimental microdosing with LSD and it makes for A Really Good Day by Ayelet Waldman. This mesmerizing memoir of mental exploration tackles the taboo topic of drug use in our society, the frightening rise of prescription pills and the devastating addictions developing during the War on Drugs. A rollicking ride through the realm of self-realization, Waldman’s creative quest for sanity is painfully honest, hysterically funny and deeply human. I loved it!”

    McLean & Eakin Booksellers image Kristin, McLean & Eakin Booksellers
  49. The Dearly Beloved

    The Dearly Beloved follows two couples as the men navigate the social and personal turbulence of leading a New York City congregation while the women struggle to find their places and define their relationship to each other. This novel grabs you and brings you in deep right from the start. Through decades of war and protest, success and failure, love and loss, we grow to care about each of these complex characters. Along the way, we also get a glimpse into 1960s New York City and the ways place can so irrevocably impact lives. This is a book that will resonate long after you put it down.”

    Buffalo Street Books image Lisa Swayze, Buffalo Street Books
  50. NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • “From The New Yorker’s beloved cultural critic comes a bold, unflinching collection of essays about self-deception, examining everything from scammer culture to reality television.”—Esquire
     
    “A whip-smart, challenging book.”—Zadie Smith • “Jia Tolentino could be the Joan Didion of our time.”—Vulture


    Jia Tolentino is a... Read More »

Share this page!

Link too long? Use a URL Shortener