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Bestselling Audiobooks

The top 50 audiobooks on Libro.fm based on sales from our 1,000+ partner bookstore locations.

Last Updated •
  1. Educated

    “This memoir is unlike anything I've ever read, yet I fear that there are others who were raised in circumstances like Tara Westover. Westover documents her childhood devoid of education beyond the family's radical, extreme, doomsday religion with chilling detail as if investigating herself as a case study will help explain how she escaped. Highly recommend.”

    Avid Bookshop image Rachel, Avid Bookshop
  2. Where the Crawdads Sing

    “Everyone that Kya has ever known has abandoned her. From the time that she was a young child she is left behind. After the student truancy officers track her down and get her to school the children laugh at her so she retreats to the only place that she feels normal - the marshland of North Carolina. She perseveres when she has every strike against her. She fends for herself and studies the natural surroundings of the marsh carefully. She paints and catalogs her collections, studies animal biology carefully, and becomes more in tune with nature than with the townspeople who call her "The Marsh Girl." Then one day the town's "golden boy" Chase Andrews ends up dead and Kya is the one that is suspected of killing him. The story that unfolds will draw you in - I was consumed with the story to the point where I could think about little else during the day because I had to know what happened next in the book. I laughed, I cried, I did fist pumps when things go well for Kya... this book infected me and I'm still having a tough time with the idea that the book is over. I'll carry these characters and this story with me for a long time.”

    The Bookstore at Fitger's image Jennifer, The Bookstore at Fitger's
  3. Circe

    “This remarkable journey into mythology brings the ancient gods directly and viscerally into the present. Circe is a perfect mashup of elegant language, glorious storytelling, and exquisitely modern sensibilities. Miller's telling left me awed and moved by Circe and her story, all while wishing I could invite her over for a glass of wine on the porch. How this amazing author so perfectly melds the human and the divine, creating a story both immediate and epic, is dazzling.”

    Beth Albrecht image Beth Albrecht, The Magic Tree Bookstore
  4. Becoming

    “I adore our former president and I miss him. Yet I cannot help but be ecstatic that Michelle is coming out with a book about her own life so that I can learn more about this powerful, intelligent, and singularly awesome woman. Barack would be the first to say that his wife is a superstar, and I can’t wait to get my hands on Becoming to read about her in her own words.”

    Bookshop Santa Cruz image Jax, Bookshop Santa Cruz
  5. Daisy Jones & The Six

    “Written as an oral history chronicling the astronomic rise and fall of a Fleetwood Mac-esque rock band in the late '70s, DAISY JONES & THE SIX is a gorgeous, dishy, and profound book that I devoured in something like two days. The story races like gangbusters and cuts straight to the hearts and souls of the superbly-drawn characters, who all have a lot to say about music, creativity, fame, family, love, collaboration, and (of course) sex, drugs, and rock 'n' roll. Definitely one of my favorite books of the year so far!”

    One More Page image Rebecca, One More Page
  6. SHORTLISTED FOR THE BOOKER PRIZE

    Margaret Atwood's dystopian masterpiece, The Handmaid's Tale, has become a modern classic—and now she brings the iconic story to a dramatic conclusion in this riveting sequel.


    More than fifteen years after the events of The Handmaid's Tale, the theocratic regime of the Republic of Gilead maintains its grip on... Read More »

  7. City of Girls

    City of Girls is a champagne cocktail, a tonic for anything that ails you, and the summer read you can’t miss! Vivian Morris, an upper-class, 19-year-old college dropout, finds herself in the chaotic New York City theater world of the 1940s. What ensues is a story full of sex, glamour, and witty one-liners that spans decades. All those who led a heedless youth or wish they had will fall for this book about growing into the person you’ve always wanted to be. Gilbert has written a glittering piece of fiction that subtly delivers wisdom about the nature of human connection and leaves the reader braver, freer, and, at least for the moment, happier.”

    Books & Books image Caroline McGregor, Books & Books
  8. Talking to Strangers

    “Gladwell's synthesis of famous news clips, infamous moments in history, and a collection of behavioral studies is uncannily fascinating. I found myself at turns nodding along with his points and shaking my head incredulously. While I was reading, I would over-analyze conversations and encounters I had with strangers, and then laugh at myself for being so paranoid. I rose to the enraged defense of the victims of violent crimes he recounted in the book and was horrified to find myself possibly trying to understand with some of the behaviors of the perpetrators. In the end, I'm not sure I agree with everything Gladwell discussed. But then again, I don't think he set out to convince anyone of any particular thing. His goal was to answer what could have happened in the case of Sandra Bland and to peel back the layers to expose human behaviors and assumptions that could have possibly played a role in the incident. This was the first book by Gladwell that I've read and I look forward to exploring more of his work. This audiobook was particularly interesting. Gladwell narrated but integrated interview clips, news sound bites, and actor reenactments throughout the audio. At first jarring and a little worrisome, because I thought I wasn't going to understand the clips due to audio quality, it was an addition that I found myself enjoying and really added depth to the book's thematic goals. I definitely recommend this book! Especially the audiobook version.”

    Gottwals Books image Rebekah, Gottwals Books
  9. The Silent Patient

    “When Theo Faber starts his new job at the Grove, a forensic psychiatric hospital, he is determined to work with the famous painter Alicia Berenson, who allegedly murdered her husband. What follows is a tale that will grip you and keep you guessing. With the incredible voice talent of Jack Hawkins, the audiobook elicits the feeling of something very slowly creeping up your spine, and will have you gripping your seat with anxiety throughout. An expansive cast of characters populates this novel, all with intricate connections and relationships, all with dark secrets of their own, making anyone and everyone a suspect. The ending twist was so intense and so unexpected, I had to pause the narration for a moment to scream and gather myself before I could move on. I highly recommend this audiobook for anyone who wants to explore the dark and twisted corners of the human psyche.”

    Oxford Exchange image Kaitlyn, Oxford Exchange
  10. Calypso

    “Calypso by David Sedaris is laugh out loud hysterical in true Sedaris fashion. Listening to him read and deliver his stories is like listening to a stand-up comedian. This collection is fairly personal and many stories involve his family and their adventures in his North Carolinian beach house, aptly name the “Sea Section”. Sedaris manages to tackle even difficult issues like suicide and aging with grace and just the right amount of self-deprecation mixed with brutal honesty. Highly recommend!”

    Wellesley Books image Phyllis, Wellesley Books
  11. A Gentleman in Moscow

    “Through Count Alexander Ilyich Rostov's ordinary encounters and activities within the bounds of the four walls of post-revolutionary Moscow's Metropol Hotel, where he is under house arrest, Towles deftly guides readers across a century of Russian history, from the Bolshevik uprising to the dawn of the nuclear age under Krushchev. Grandiloquent language and drama reminiscent of Tolstoy gradually give way to action and tradecraft suggestive of le Carre in this lovely and entertaining tale of one man's determination to maintain his dignity and passion for life, even after being stripped of his title, belongings, and freedom. Reading A Gentleman in Moscow is pure pleasure!”

    The Vermont Book Shop image Becky Dayton, The Vermont Book Shop
  12. The Nickel Boys

    “A brilliant black boy, in the wrong car, meets the wrong cop. A for-profit penal system puts him in a reform school run by abusers, with a suspicious graveyard out back. What happens next is... a powerful arc bending toward justice? Colson Whitehead delivers a book about suffering that does not revel in suffering, a book about keeping soul in a broken world, a book that leaves the reader wanting the hero to embrace the person he has become.”

    The Haunted Bookshop image Nialle, The Haunted Bookshop
  13. Evvie Drake Starts Over

    “I enjoyed following Evvie's journey as she navigated her life and figured out how to handle loss, love, friendships, family and happiness. This book was a great escape with a sweet romance woven throughout. I enjoyed the nods to NPR and, since I'm from Minnesota, enjoyed the mentions of my home state as well. A perfect beach listen!”

    Content image Myrna, Content
  14. There There

    “There There is the kind of book that grabs you from the start and doesn’t let go, even after you’ve turned the last page. It is a work of fiction, but every word of it feels true. Tommy Orange writes with a palpable anger and pain, telling the history of a cultural trauma handed down through generations in the blood and bones and stories of individual lives. He also writes with incredible heart and humor, infusing his characters with a tangible humanity and moments of joy even as they are headed toward tragedy. There There has claimed a permanent spot in my heart despite having broken it, or maybe because it did. I think this may be the best book I’ve ever read.”

    Changing Hands image Heather Weldon, Changing Hands
  15. On Earth We're Briefly Gorgeous

    “Written as a letter from son to mother, Ocean Vuong's On Earth We're Briefly Gorgeous is desolately beautiful. Each carefully crafted sentence builds upon the last, a momentum that carries you through a hundred pages before you remember to take a breath. Bleak, brilliant, it is the book other books will be compared to for years. Honestly, I would have been fine if it had been the last book I ever read.”

    Cody image Cody, Book Culture, @thecodystuart
  16. The Secrets We Kept

    “This perfect historical novel is made of the most alluring ingredients. First, a divine and doomed love affair between Russian author Boris Pasternak and his muse and secretary, Olga Ivinskaya, a woman immortalized in Pasternak’s epic novel Doctor Zhivago, which was banned in Russia for more than 30 years. Second, two American women typists working for CIA and their forbidden love story in the midst of the Cold War and the witch hunt against homosexuals. Lara Prescott brilliantly portrays how a timeless novel like Doctor Zhivago can change course of history. After I finished reading The Secrets We Kept, I pressed the book against my chest, as if I could hear the lovers’ hearts still beating.”

    Aggie Zivaljevic image Aggie Zivaljevic, Kepler's Books
  17. The Library Book

    “The Library Book by Susan Orleans is ostensibly about the Central Los Angeles library fire in 1986 but it is SO much more! Orleans' incredibly well researched and yet personal history and commentary on the public library system in the United States is fascinating on many levels. The mystery surrounding the fire is a story unto itself with an interesting cast of characters including the man who was accused but never convicted of arson. In addition, the personalities of the librarians and administrators of the LA library system are varied and incredibly colorful. Finally, Orleans examines the ever-changing roles of public libraries and how information dissemination and services for the homeless are some of the greatest challenges facing libraries today. I listened to this book on LIBRO and hearing Susan Orleans read was a joy! Really a terrific read for anyone interested in books, libraries, social justice, architecture and even crime drama!”

    Wellesley Books image Phyllis, Wellesley Books
  18. The Turn of the Key

    “Ruth Ware is back and at her dazzling best with The Turn of the Key. This arresting tribute to Henry James set in modern-day remote Scotland posts a nanny in a ‘smart house’ with several recalcitrant children and a garden full of poisonous plants. Who do you trust when everyone seems to be hiding something? Readers will be reading with all the lights on as they race to the climactic ending to see just who is minding who in this engaging summer thriller.”

    Excelsior Bay Books image Pamela Klinger-Horn, Excelsior Bay Books
  19. The Lager Queen of Minnesota

    “A Minnesota family grounded in farming, beer, and award-winning pies is split for decades when one of two sisters inherits the farm. Helen and Edith — whose stories author J. Ryan Stradal effectively weaves together — stop speaking, while one’s fortunes soar and the other’s plummet. When a woman of the next generation has a chance at success, she may also reunite the Calder family. Stradal brings the heartland to the page with warmth, humor, and plenty of hops-inspired lore.”

    Book Passage image Cheryl McKeon, Book Passage
  20. Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine

    “Eleanor Oliphant has quickly become one of my favorite fictional characters, and this novel one of my favorite books. Eleanor is completely original and the right kind of weird. Her life and her past, combined with such kindhearted characters, made for a compulsively readable, heartwarming story that I did not want to put down. I can't wait for this book to come out so many more can fall in love with Eleanor. Highly, highly recommended.”

    Copperfield's Books image Kaitlin Smith, Copperfield's Books
  21. The Ten Thousand Doors of January

    “This lovely, magical book is a coming-of-age story that blends the best qualities of the adventure stories of the early 20th century with some thoroughly modern sensibilities. January Scaller is an almost-orphan in the early 1900s, the unlikely ward of a rich collector of antiquities who employs her father to travel the world discovering treasures for his collections. When she discovers that she has the ability to open doors into other worlds, she finds a myriad of other civilizations, some beautiful, some terrifying, where the color of her skin and her gender don't matter the way they do in her own world. But her discovery threatens everything she believes about her life, her family and herself. The Ten Thousand Doors of January features beautiful writing and heart-stopping action. The perfect crossover novel, it will appeal equally to teens and adults alike. And January LaVoy's talented narration makes the story leap from the page. It's an immensely satisfying book!”

    Inklings Bookshop image Emily, Inklings Bookshop
  22. By Richard Powers / Narrated by Suzanne Toren

    The Overstory

    “Do you love trees? Probably not as much as Richard Powers does! This books weaves together the converging stories of nine characters, but they really function as a means to probe the perspective of the trees themselves. With lyrical prose and amazing stories of naturalist history, this is an epic of environmental literature.”

    Avid Bookshop image David, Avid Bookshop
  23. Unsheltered

    “A new Barbara Kingsolver novel is always a gift but this time her fictional journey feels even more powerful as she asks, “Can history help us navigate an impossible-looking future?” Unsheltered tells the stories of two families from different centuries living under the same roof, reeling from turbulence on both a national and a familial scale. Shelter is a basic survival need, but Kingsolver, being the literary artist she is, uses her characters to consider how we use physical, intellectual, and emotional shelters to navigate such troubles. The storms of life will surely rage but shelters can save our lives.”

    Bookshop Santa Cruz image Casey & Jenny, Bookshop Santa Cruz
  24. Ann Patchett, the New York Times bestselling author of Commonwealth and State of Wonder, returns with her most powerful novel to date: a richly moving story that explores the indelible bond between two siblings, the house of their childhood, and a past that will not let them go.

    “'Do you think it’s possible to ever see the past as it actually... Read More »

  25. By Celeste Ng / Narrated by Jennifer Lim

    Little Fires Everywhere

    “Little Fires Everywhere is a breathtaking novel about art, motherhood, and truth. Mia and her daughter, Pearl, move to the perfectly planned community of Shaker Heights as the last stop on their nomadic adventure, bringing some much-needed permanence to teenager Pearl's life. They both find friendship, but the connections they create with their landlord's family will soon change all of their lives. Impossible to put down or stop thinking about. A great read.”

    Stef Schmidt image Stef Schmidt, Water Street Books
  26. The Immortalists

    “In 1969, four siblings visit a fortune teller, who tells each child the date of their death. We follow the Gold siblings both separately and together over the next four decades and see how these revelations affect their choices, their behavior, and their relationships with one another. Apart from raising the obvious question (would you want to know the date of your death?), Benjamin brilliantly explores how family members can be both close to and distant from one another, and ponders the point at which our actions cease to matter and fate steps in. I LOVED The Immortalists, and if there's any justice in bookselling, this book will find the massive audience it so deserves.”

    RoscoeBooks image Erika VanDam, RoscoeBooks
  27. Never Have I Ever

    “Joshilyn Jackson is a masterful storyteller! I is a rare thing in my audio adventures, to find an author who can write AND narrate with equal ability, but Joshilyn Jackson is amazing on both fronts. Somewhere between a purring cat and a slythering snake, Joshilyn's silky voice pulls the reader so deep into this cat and mouse thriller as to almost be physically uncomfortable. This is the type of audio book that will find the listener missing an exit, staying up way too late, or completely losing track of what they were doing.”

    Anderson's Bookshop image Mary, Anderson's Bookshop
  28. From #1 New York Times bestselling author Stephen King, the most riveting and unforgettable story of kids confronting evil since It—publishing just as the second part of It, the movie, lands in theaters.

    In the middle of the night, in a house on a quiet street in suburban Minneapolis, intruders silently murder Luke Ellis’s parents and load him... Read More »

  29. The Witch Elm

    “Reading Tana French means disappearing into another life for a while. Her stories aren’t meant to be slick or flashy, but deliberate, intricate studies of characters and their motivations. The Witch Elm is no different, as it follows the unraveling of Toby starting the night he surprises two burglars in his apartment. As you learn the secrets and weaknesses of Toby and his family, you begin to realize that while finding out what happened is enjoyable and surprising, finding out the how and the why is even better.”

    Avid Bookshop image Tyler Goodson, Avid Bookshop
  30. The Song of Achilles

    “A sweeping emotional tale of war, passion, and devastation. You are given insight into a hero's life through the eyes of Patroclus in a way that has never been done before.You may think you know the story of Achilles and Patroclus but I promise you, you don't. Miller is able to ensnare your imagination and capture the human spirit in a way few authors before have been able to do.”

    Anderson's Bookshop image Katrina, Anderson's Bookshop
  31. Three Women

    “I can’t recall the last time I’ve been reading a work of nonfiction and woken up excited purely by the fact that, today, I would get to read more. Compulsive and psychologically riveting, Three Women reads like a novel. I couldn’t keep from dog-earing its pages each time Taddeo perfectly expressed something I’d felt but never had the words for. In Sloane, Maggie, and Lina, I recognized aspects of myself — namely the desire for connection and for love. When three women tell their uncensored truth, they can liberate a nation. I feel deeply grateful to Lisa Taddeo for giving us this gift of raw authenticity.”

    Michaela Carter image Michaela Carter, Peregrine Book Company
  32. The Tattooist of Auschwitz

    “I devoured The Tattooist of Auschwitz, a powerful book based on a true story, in two sittings. Lale, a Slovakian Jew at Auschwitz-Birkenau, becomes the Tatowierer—the man responsible for tattooing every prisoner who arrives at the concentration camp. Seen by some as a collaborator, Lale must make impossible choices to keep himself and his friends alive. Incredibly, Lale tattoos the woman who will become the love of his life. The power of their love in the face of unmitigated horror makes for one of the most compelling WWII books I have ever read.”

    Dog Ear Books image Carrie Deming, Dog Ear Books
  33. Children of Blood and Bone

    “Children of Blood & Bone, is a story told in a world where magic no longer exists. Years ago, this was not the case. Once, magic and the Gods were celebrated. Now, Diviners (those with Maji blood, but no magic) are treated poorly, and all the Maji have been killed. One of those including our main protagonist, Zélie’s, mother. Determined to find a way to bring back magic, Zélie, along with her brother Tzain, and Orïsha’s only princess, Amari (gone rogue), set out on a quest against all odds. Told from Zélie, Amari and Amari’s brother and crown prince, Inan’s viewpoints, Tomi Adeyemi weaves together a tale so beautifully and tragically relevant, it will leave you craving for answers and more.”

    Vroman’s Bookstore image Jen, Vroman’s Bookstore
  34. "Robert Bathurst's intelligent narration captures every nuance, every emotion, and each of Louise Penny's subtle revelations about the unique, completely engaging residents of Three Pines." — AudioFile Magazine, Earphones Award winner

    Catastrophic spring flooding, blistering attacks in the media, and a mysterious disappearance greet Chief... Read More »

  35. The Long Call

    “I absolutely loved The Long Call. In this new mystery, Ann Cleeves introduces us to Inspector Matthew Venn, who embodies his diagram namesake as a character caught between his past and his future. A murder on a beach in Venn’s hometown on the English coast leads to a kidnapping, and as the pacing picks up, the suspects get ever closer to Venn’s personal life. An expertly plotted mystery that will keep readers guessing until the final pages.”

    Keith Vient image Keith Vient, Politics and Prose Bookstore
  36. Ask Again, Yes

    “"Love is only part of the story" is a quote taken from one of the last pages of "Yes, Again Yes." Love may be just a fraction of this fabulous novel but it is also the thread that weaves this heartbreaking tale together. The novel centers around two families who are next-door neighbors. The patriarchs are policemen. The families are not friends due to one of the family member's mental illness. However, there is a deep friendship that develops between the teenage daughter and son. An unthinkable tragedy occurs and one of the families moves away. "Yes, Again Yes" explores life, love, family ties, tragedy, heartbreak, mental illness and the strong power fo love. I enjoyed every moment of this moving novel and highly recommend it. The narration is well-done.”

    Buttonwood Books and Toys image Melinda, Buttonwood Books and Toys
  37. Red, White & Royal Blue

    “Fresh, irreverent, and funny, Red, White & Royal Blue is a delight and a treasure. With subtle jabs, Casey McQuiston pokes fun at both the public face of the British monarchy as well as the back-door politicking that dominates the U.S. political scene. The story follows the self-centered Alex Claremont-Diaz (America’s First Son) and his interactions with British Prince Henry of Wales. As hostility increases between two political scions forced into a sham friendship, we see the framework of political destiny and duty begin to fray. Little by little, hostility turns to something else entirely. This is a story about happiness — and, more importantly, honesty — for those who live their lives in the public eye.”

    The Book Cellar image Todd Ketcham, The Book Cellar
  38. Black Leopard, Red Wolf

    “Black Leopard, Red Wolf is fantastically queer, black, and confounding! It is an enticing read, filled with love, sex, betrayal, and truths that are not so true.”

    Dartricia image Dartricia, @dartricia_
  39. Lincoln in the Bardo

    “Saunders' first novel has a steep entry curve. It's not a novel that reveals itself quickly and easily, but if you give it your attention, if you burrow deep into the book, you'll be eminently rewarded. There is a richness and depth of humanity here. There is the strange and wonderful. There is love and grief and mystery all brought together in the story of Abraham Lincoln's dead son, the Civil War, and what may happen to us all after we leave the mortal coil. It's a beautiful and moving book that will stay with you for a long, long while.”

    University Book Store image Jason Vanhee, University Book Store
  40. Killers of the Flower Moon

    “In "Killers of the Flower Moon", David Grann recounts the tragic tale of the Osage Indian Nations decimation and deceit at the hands of their government appointed guardians. Motivated by money, morally corrupt and masterfully manipulative, the true role of these benevolent benefactors, perpetrators of mass murder, is still a mystery today. Granns detailed, yet deeply disturbing detective work, back to the birth of the FBI and the rise of J. Edgar Hoover, unveils an unimaginable injustice overlooked for 85 years. Let’s not allow this atrocious act against the Osage to slip back into obscurity ever again.”

    McLean & Eakin Booksellers image Kristin, McLean & Eakin Booksellers
  41. Inland

    “Man, I could live my whole life inside this novel and be perfectly happy. Téa Obreht is the real thing. Inland has the stern gorgeousness of Blood Meridian, the cinematic perfection of Station Eleven, the fantasia-like atmosphere of Cloud Atlas, and the deep-heartedness of The Winter Soldier. This is the sort of novel that makes people want to get up and soldier on. I really loved this book.”

    Flyleaf Books image Erica Eisdorfer, Flyleaf Books
  42. Hollow Kingdom

    “This is the zombie apocalypse like you’ve never seen it before! Things go sideways when S.T. the crow’s human, Big Jim, loses an eyeball. Jim’s worsening condition propels S.T. to leave the safety of domestic life, along with the simple, slobbering bloodhound, Dennis. Together they roam the ruins of Seattle, searching for purpose in this new, Cheeto-less world. While Hollow Kingdom mostly follows the foul-mouthed, human-loving crow, Buxton also takes the occasional detour to see how other animals are coping around the world. Not only is our corvid companion a profane delight, she also manages to effortlessly capture the aloof arrogance of a cat, the wise cadence of an elephant, and even the eternal serenity of trees. Hilarious and at times surprisingly poignant, Hollow Kingdom is a must-read for anyone with a sense of humor as black as a crow’s wing.”

    Mysterious Galaxy Books image Darcy, Mysterious Galaxy Books
  43. Mrs. Everything

    Mrs. Everything is a magnificent look at the myriad societal changes for women that occurred in a short span of decades, wrapped up in a compelling novel of two sisters. While I’ve loved reading all of Jennifer Weiner’s work over the years, I believe THIS is her legacy novel — the book that will be read generations from now! It filled my heart.”

    Caitlin Doggart image Caitlin Doggart, Fabled Bookshop & Café
  44. By Tamsyn Muir / Narrated by Moira Quirk

    Gideon the Ninth

    Gideon the Ninth is an epic science fantasy that if delivered into the hands of enough people will set the world on fire as it hasn’t been since The Hunger Games. Brilliance doesn’t come close to explaining Tamsyn Muir’s narrative where no single word is wasted or her engineering of a world with characters that end up belonging to you wholeheartedly even long after the last page. With fierce independence and hysterical wit, and laced with moments of pure heartbreaking tenderness and loyalty, Gideon and Harrow’s relationship simultaneously digs under your skin and tugs at your heartstrings. I cannot recommend this book highly enough.”

    Nichole Cousins image Nichole Cousins, Still North Books & Bar
  45. By Min Jin Lee / Narrated by Allison Hiroto

    Pachinko (National Book Award Finalist)

    “A father's gentle nature, a mother's sacrifice, a daughter's trust, and a son's determination are the cornerstones of this grand, multilayered saga. Pachinko follows one family through an ever-changing cultural landscape, from 1910 Korea to 1989 Japan. As the bonds of family are put to the test in the harsh realities of their world, Sunja and those she holds dear manage to carve themselves a place to call home with hard work, self sacrifice, and a little kimchi. Through it all is a message about love, faith, and the deep-rooted bonds of family. Min Jin Lee gives us a phenomenal story about one family's struggle that resonates with us today. It will take hold of you and not let go!”

    Jennifer Steele image Jennifer Steele, Boswell Book Company
  46. If you enjoyed A Really Good Day, then you’ll love How to Change Your Mind.

    “Take an over-medicated, moody, middle-aged mother of four, add a month of experimental microdosing with LSD and it makes for A Really Good Day by Ayelet Waldman. This mesmerizing memoir of mental exploration tackles the taboo topic of drug use in our society, the frightening rise of prescription pills and the devastating addictions developing during the War on Drugs. A rollicking ride through the realm of self-realization, Waldman’s creative quest for sanity is painfully honest, hysterically funny and deeply human. I loved it!”

    McLean & Eakin Booksellers image Kristin, McLean & Eakin Booksellers
  47. The Dearly Beloved

    The Dearly Beloved follows two couples as the men navigate the social and personal turbulence of leading a New York City congregation while the women struggle to find their places and define their relationship to each other. This novel grabs you and brings you in deep right from the start. Through decades of war and protest, success and failure, love and loss, we grow to care about each of these complex characters. Along the way, we also get a glimpse into 1960s New York City and the ways place can so irrevocably impact lives. This is a book that will resonate long after you put it down.”

    Buffalo Street Books image Lisa Swayze, Buffalo Street Books
  48. Chances Are . . .

    “Richard Russo's novel of three chums reuniting five decades after graduation from their small liberal arts college captures all the significance of old friends reconnecting, but, more importantly, discovering truths about themselves. As always, Russo's dialect carries the story, and as an audio this is especially enjoyable. Covering the years from their shared experience of the Dec. 1, 1969 draft number lottery to the present (with its current political angst) history and Russo's inimitable character development combine in this satisfying novel.”

    Book Passage image Cheryl, Book Passage
  49. I'll Be Gone in the Dark

    “An overwhelmingly obsessed Michelle McNamara dissects the decades old trail of tragedy, trauma and ongoing taunts by the elusive East Area Rapist in her investigative crime thriller “I’ll Be Gone in the Dark” published posthumously after her unexpected demise. Dubbed the “Golden State Killer” by McNamara herself, his crime spree started with 50 unsolved rapes before escalating to numerous murders leaving terrorized California residents tense for ten years. A determined McNamara meticulously researches this reign of terror with such precision it’s sure to pry this perpetrators identity out of obscurity and into justice, a suitable ending for this authors’ life.”

    McLean & Eakin Booksellers image Kristin, McLean & Eakin Booksellers
  50. By Laura Lippman / Narrated by Susan Bennett

    Lady in the Lake

    “I continue to be in awe of Laura Lippman’s ability to write novels that are so much more than mysteries. Lady in the Lake is, of course, a wonderful mystery with twists and turns and surprises —nothing is predictable. But it is also a beautiful character study and a sensitive look at the desire to have a meaningful life and how ambition can be motivating but also blinding. I loved the multiple voices in the novel— Laura’s characters are never perfect and therefore come across as real people with real needs. I have no doubt that Lady in the Lake will be a huge success.”

    The Ivy Bookshop image Ann Berlin, The Ivy Bookshop
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