Let's Pretend This Never Happened

A Mostly True Memoir

By Jenny Lawson

8 hours 40 minutes

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When Jenny Lawson was little, all she ever wanted was to fit in.

That dream was cut short by her fantastically unbalanced father and a morbidly eccentric childhood. It did, however, open up an opportunity for Lawson to find the humor in the strange shame spiral that is her life, and we are all the better for it.

In the irreverent Let’s Pretend This Never Happened, Lawson’s long-suffering husband and sweet daughter help her uncover the surprising discovery that the most terribly human moments—the ones we want to pretend never happened—are the very same moments that make us the people we are today. For every intellectual misfit who thought they were the only ones to think the things that Lawson dares to say out loud, this is a poignant and hysterical look at the dark, disturbing, yet wonderful moments of our lives.

The Bloggess writes stuff that actually is laugh-out-loud [funny], but you know that really you shouldn’t be laughing and probably you’ll go to hell for laughing, so maybe you shouldn’t read it. That would be safer and wiser.

Neil Gaiman

Jenny Lawson’s writing is nothing less than revolutionary . . . I say this without a hint of exaggeration: She may be one of the most progressive women’s voices of our time.

Karen Walrond, author of The Beauty of Different

About the Author

Known for her sardonic wit and her hysterically skewed outlook on life, Jenny Lawson has made millions of people question their own sanity, as they found themselves admitting that they, too, often wondered why Jesus wasn’t classified as a zombie, or laughed to the point of bladder failure when she accidentally forgot that she mailed herself a cobra. Lawson’s blog (TheBloggess.com) is award-winning and extremely popular, and she is considered one of the funniest writers of our generation by at least three or four people.

Reviews

Lawson’s self-deprecating humor is not only gaspingly funny and wonderfully inappropriate; it allows her to speak about subjects like depression, anxiety, and infertility in a real and raw way.

O, The Oprah Magazine

[Lawson] creates a comic character that readers will engage with in shocked dismay as they gratefully turn the pages.

Kirkus Reviews

Akin to Sedaris if he were an anxiety-stricken Texas mother with a fascination with the zombie apocalypse. . . . The randomness only adds to the charm. . . . Did a cougar casually stroll through her backyard last week? Does she really have a zombie kit stashed under her bed? Who cares? The world Lawson inhabits, however much invented, is a glorious place to be.

The Washington Post

Author

ISBN
9781101564479

Length
8 hours 40 minutes

Language
English

Publisher
Penguin Random House Audio Publishing Group

Publication Date

Abridged
No

  • You should just accept who you are, flaws and all, because if you try to be someone you aren't, then eventually some turkey is going to shit all over your well-crafted facade, so you might as well save yourself the effort and enjoy your zombie books.
  • Because you are defined not by life's imperfect moments, but by your reaction to them. And because there is joy in embracing—rather than running from—the utter absurdity of life.
  • I can finally see that all the terrible parts of my life, the embarrassing parts, the incidents I wanted to pretend never happened, and the things that make me 'weird' and 'different,' were actually the most important parts of my life. They were the parts that made me ME.

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