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Bestselling Audiobooks

The top 50 audiobooks on Libro.fm based on sales from our 1,000+ partner bookstore locations.

Last Updated •
  1. Where the Crawdads Sing

    “Everyone that Kya has ever known has abandoned her. From the time that she was a young child she is left behind. After the student truancy officers track her down and get her to school the children laugh at her so she retreats to the only place that she feels normal - the marshland of North Carolina. She perseveres when she has every strike against her. She fends for herself and studies the natural surroundings of the marsh carefully. She paints and catalogs her collections, studies animal biology carefully, and becomes more in tune with nature than with the townspeople who call her "The Marsh Girl." Then one day the town's "golden boy" Chase Andrews ends up dead and Kya is the one that is suspected of killing him. The story that unfolds will draw you in - I was consumed with the story to the point where I could think about little else during the day because I had to know what happened next in the book. I laughed, I cried, I did fist pumps when things go well for Kya... this book infected me and I'm still having a tough time with the idea that the book is over. I'll carry these characters and this story with me for a long time.”

    The Bookstore at Fitger's image Jennifer, The Bookstore at Fitger's
  2. Educated

    “I loved this book! Tara Westover's memoir is the kind that sounds like it should be a novel—and this book reads like one in the best way—and I think I found myself gasping and covering my mouth about once per chapter. Westover describes her upbringing in a fundamentalist Mormon, survivalist, anti-government, anti-medicine family, enduring neglect and abuse and never attending school, in a way that still somehow manages to make her family members seem sympathetic despite their actions. She is honest about her early beliefs and conflicts and addresses her own lapses in memory throughout the book, and when she finally leaves home to go to college and beyond, you can't help but cheer for her. Julia Whelan does a fantastic job narrating the book, as well, giving each character a distinct personality, but in a way that isn't distracting to the story being told. Her voice is alternately innocent and chilling and gives an added depth to a fascinating story.”

    Bank Square Books image Elissa, Bank Square Books
  3. Daisy Jones & The Six

    “Daisy Jones and the Six is a rock n roll biopic with all of the expected drugs, alcohol, fights, groupies and blackouts. Yet, it is SO much more than that. It is full of heart, anguish, and bare knuckled honesty from a group of musicians aching to find their voice, their audience and where they fit in the world. The audio book is AMAZINGLY well done. I loved every second of it.”

    Volumes Bookcafe image Rebecca, Volumes Bookcafe
  4. Becoming

    “I adore our former president and I miss him. Yet I cannot help but be ecstatic that Michelle is coming out with a book about her own life so that I can learn more about this powerful, intelligent, and singularly awesome woman. Barack would be the first to say that his wife is a superstar, and I can’t wait to get my hands on Becoming to read about her in her own words.”

    Bookshop Santa Cruz image Jax, Bookshop Santa Cruz
  5. Circe

    “Beautifully composed and deeply compelling, Circe is hands-down one of the best novels of 2018. As she did in Song of Achilles, Miller recreates the ancient and enchanting world of Greek mythology, this time focusing on ocean nymph Circe. Cast out of her home and exiled to the island of Aiaia, Circe turns not only to her enchantments, but also to the world of Mortals, becoming close with legendary figures like Daedalus, Odysseus, and Penelope. Miller’s delicate, yet stunning prose swept me off my feet — I wanted to savor every moment with Circe in her immortal world. Introspective, soft, at times simply breathtaking, but always beautiful. So, so beautiful.”

    Mysterious Galaxy Books image Kelly, Mysterious Galaxy Books
  6. Stay Sexy & Don't Get Murdered

    “Karen Kilgariff and Georgia Hardstark bring the breeziness of their popular podcast My Favorite Murder to print in this collection of life hacks and true confessions. Alternately hilarious and wise, the two play off each other with the abandon of old college buddies. Fans of The Life-Changing Magic of Not Giving a F*ck will find much to enjoy here. While the book will leave you in stitches, the advice the pair doles out is solid and bankable. The book should be in every college freshman’s backpack as they leave for school.”

    Mac's Back-Books image Grace Harper, Mac's Back-Books
  7. City of Girls

    City of Girls is a champagne cocktail, a tonic for anything that ails you, and the summer read you can’t miss! Vivian Morris, an upper-class, 19-year-old college dropout, finds herself in the chaotic New York City theater world of the 1940s. What ensues is a story full of sex, glamour, and witty one-liners that spans decades. All those who led a heedless youth or wish they had will fall for this book about growing into the person you’ve always wanted to be. Gilbert has written a glittering piece of fiction that subtly delivers wisdom about the nature of human connection and leaves the reader braver, freer, and, at least for the moment, happier.”

    Books & Books image Caroline McGregor, Books & Books
  8. If you enjoyed The Woman in the Window, then you’ll love The Silent Patient.

    “The Silent Patient is a suspenseful story that reads like a Greek tragedy, bursting with unknowns and sprinkled with exciting twists. It is a brilliant novel written by a man that certainly knows how to write something gripping and dramatic, perfect for readers that liked 'The Woman in the Window". At the center of the story is the mystery that is Alicia Berenson, an incredibly gifted painter that was convicted of murdering her husband six years before the start of the book. According to those close to the Berensons, Alicia and Gabriel had a great marriage and were happy together. Then one day Gabriel was tied to a chair and shot five times in the face. Alicia was found standing over his dead body, his blood splattered on her, and the murder weapon had only her fingerprints; it was enough to arrest her for the murder of her husband of seven years. The media circled over this story not because of the actual crime, but because Alicia stayed silent throughout the trial, not even to speak up in her own defense, and has not uttered a word for the past six years. This not only made her case known nationally, but it landed her in Grove Psychiatric Hospital instead of prison. Years have passed and people have forgotten about Alicia Berenson, everyone except Theo Faber, a troubled psychotherapist that has been obsessed with her case since the very beginning and believes he can help her. When a position opens at the declining Grove Psychiatric Hospital, Theo quits his better-paying job and jumps at the chance to finally work with Alicia and get to the bottom of why she has remained silent for the past six years. It is the chance of a lifetime for him. Alex Michaelides is a talented screenwriter that was inspired by a post graduate course in psychotherapy and working part-time at a secure psychiatric unit, meaning that the writing and structure of this debut novel is brilliantly done, and the story is layered with reality. An excellent read!”

    McLean & Eakin Booksellers image Devin, McLean & Eakin Booksellers
  9. The Library Book

    “There is no one better at investigating the fascinating stories hiding in plain sight than Susan Orlean. The vivid descriptions of the fire that engulfed the Los Angeles Central Library in 1986 are burnished by the meticulous research she did on the history of libraries and on the shocking event that resulted in the destruction and damage of over one million books. The mystery of who would start such a fire is woven between stories of eccentric librarians and the transformation of Los Angeles in the 20th century. From memories of the blissful hours spent in the library of her youth to the historical significance of these repositories of our past, Orlean has crafted a love letter to the importance of the written word and those who devote their lives to its preservation.”

    Book Passage image Luisa Smith, Book Passage
  10. Calypso

    “Calypso by David Sedaris is laugh out loud hysterical in true Sedaris fashion. Listening to him read and deliver his stories is like listening to a stand-up comedian. This collection is fairly personal and many stories involve his family and their adventures in his North Carolinian beach house, aptly name the “Sea Section”. Sedaris manages to tackle even difficult issues like suicide and aging with grace and just the right amount of self-deprecation mixed with brutal honesty. Highly recommend!”

    Wellesley Books image Phyllis, Wellesley Books
  11. Red, White & Royal Blue

    “Fresh, irreverent, and funny, Red, White & Royal Blue is a delight and a treasure. With subtle jabs, Casey McQuiston pokes fun at both the public face of the British monarchy as well as the back-door politicking that dominates the U.S. political scene. The story follows the self-centered Alex Claremont-Diaz (America’s First Son) and his interactions with British Prince Henry of Wales. As hostility increases between two political scions forced into a sham friendship, we see the framework of political destiny and duty begin to fray. Little by little, hostility turns to something else entirely. This is a story about happiness — and, more importantly, honesty — for those who live their lives in the public eye.”

    The Book Cellar image Todd Ketcham, The Book Cellar
  12. There There

    “A stunning debut novel by an original voice. Twelve characters of Native American descent, interrelated by birth or chance, struggle with the competing forces of cultural history and modern urban existence. Their stories build separately before colliding powerfully in the book’s final pages at The Big Oakland Powwow. I was riveted.”

    Parnassus Books image Keltie, Parnassus Books
  13. A Gentleman in Moscow

    “Through Count Alexander Ilyich Rostov's ordinary encounters and activities within the bounds of the four walls of post-revolutionary Moscow's Metropol Hotel, where he is under house arrest, Towles deftly guides readers across a century of Russian history, from the Bolshevik uprising to the dawn of the nuclear age under Krushchev. Grandiloquent language and drama reminiscent of Tolstoy gradually give way to action and tradecraft suggestive of le Carre in this lovely and entertaining tale of one man's determination to maintain his dignity and passion for life, even after being stripped of his title, belongings, and freedom. Reading A Gentleman in Moscow is pure pleasure!”

    The Vermont Book Shop image Becky Dayton, The Vermont Book Shop
  14. On Earth We're Briefly Gorgeous

    “Alright 2019, this is the novel to beat. On Earth We’re Briefly Gorgeous is the rare novel that makes you experience reading in a slightly different way and shows you that, no matter how many books you’ve read, something new and uniquely beautiful can still be found. The novel takes the form of a letter written by the main character, Little Dog, to his mother — an immigrant from Vietnam who cannot read. The power of Vuong’s poetic writing shimmers with every paragraph, and each phrase is a carefully considered, emotional journey. Grappling with themes of identity, sexuality, addiction, violence, and finding your place in a world where you feel you don’t belong, this book already feels like a modern classic, destined to be read and talked about for years to come.”

    Bookmarks image Caleb Masters, Bookmarks
  15. By Celeste Ng / Narrated by Jennifer Lim

    Little Fires Everywhere

    “Little Fires Everywhere is a breathtaking novel about art, motherhood, and truth. Mia and her daughter, Pearl, move to the perfectly planned community of Shaker Heights as the last stop on their nomadic adventure, bringing some much-needed permanence to teenager Pearl's life. They both find friendship, but the connections they create with their landlord's family will soon change all of their lives. Impossible to put down or stop thinking about. A great read.”

    Stef Schmidt image Stef Schmidt, Water Street Books
  16. Unsheltered

    “A brilliant novel set in two different centuries, eras when lies trumped truth and superstition overruled science. Kingsolver illustrates human resiliency with insight, humor, and compassion in this deeply satisfying novel. While showing the cost of leadership built on false promises and lies, it also illustrates the strength of the human spirit with characters who will not be broken by their times. Kingsolver’scharacters, including historical figures Mary Treat and Charles Landis, shine as they make their way through the maze of survival set before them. Great reading.”

    Deon Stonehouse image Deon Stonehouse, Sunriver Books & Music
  17. By Ruth Reichl / Narrated by Ruth Reichl

    Save Me the Plums

    “Disclosure: I am not a foodie even though I am married to a former chef. What sparked my interest in Save Me The Plums was the subject - Gourmet Magazine. Although neither of my parents could cook to save their lives, we always proudly displayed and saved every copy of Gourmet Magazine that came with our yearly subscription. I listened to the audio which is read by the author, Ruth Reichl, who went from food critic to editor in chief of Gourmet Magazine. Most times, I don't like the author reading their own books because of the poor delivery. Not in this case - Reichl does a fabulous job with her reading. The details of the inner workings of Conde Nast were fascinating. Although she was not a self-proclaimed feminist, she knew instinctively how to handle tense situations as well as difficult people. I enjoyed hearing about everything from the strong personalities of the staff to the beautiful offices and test kitchen. There are also mouthwatering recipes included in this memoir. I may not have been a foodie when I began Save The Plums but thanks to Ruth Reichl, I have a whole new appreciation for food and a successful food magazine. I highly recommend this delicious memoir.”

    Buttonwood Books and Toys image Melinda, Buttonwood Books and Toys
  18. The Immortalists

    “The Immortalists by Chloe Benjamin is a unique story investigating fate and destiny. Four siblings visit a fortune teller whose talent is predicting the date of death for her clients. Does this knowledge at an impressionable age inform life decisions that render the prediction true or is it a hoax? You will get to know these siblings very well as Benjamin traces their lives and their choices. In the end—who really knows what determines when your time on this earth should come to an end? Intriguing.”

    Wellesley Books image Phyllis, Wellesley Books
  19. By Richard Powers / Narrated by Suzanne Toren

    The Overstory

    “Do you love trees? Probably not as much as Richard Powers does! This books weaves together the converging stories of nine characters, but they really function as a means to probe the perspective of the trees themselves. With lyrical prose and amazing stories of naturalist history, this is an epic of environmental literature.”

    Avid Bookshop image David, Avid Bookshop
  20. The Tattooist of Auschwitz

    “What a great easy read. We just finished it in our store book club and everyone enjoyed it. It’s a different perspective of the consentration camps from a survivors view. It shows humanity in survival mode and yet these two survivors still manage to find love in such a dark place.”

    The Book Center image Danielle, The Book Center
  21. Mrs. Everything

    “"We lose ourselves along the way, but we find our way back." This quote came from the ending of Mrs. Everything. To me, those few words sum up the heart of the book. Mrs. Everything is the tale of two sisters. Jo, the eldest, is smart, athletic, opinionated, and questions her sexuality in adolescence. Bethie is sweet, talented, popular and also happens to be their mother's favorite. The girls share a strong bond which lasts a lifetime. The story takes place in the 1950s in Detroit. Through the years, the reader witnesses the sisters go through the death of their father, their first loves, their college years, and all the choices that the women make in their adult years. I listened to Mrs. Everything during two long car rides and I enjoyed every minute of it. In the end, it was difficult for me to bid goodbye to Jo and Bethie. I felt great love and admiration for both of them. There were two narrators that were an absolute delight to my ears. I highly recommend this thought-provoking book. It will spark great discussions in book clubs as well.”

    Buttonwood Books and Toys image Melinda, Buttonwood Books and Toys
  22. Children of Blood and Bone

    “A sprawling fantasy teeming with deep and meaningful magic. One of the things I like most about this debut is that it raises very real and important issues of our time through multiple character's perspectives. No character is one-dimensional, and every character must learn from failure and introspection to become who they were meant to be.”

    Mysterious Galaxy Books image Kelly, Mysterious Galaxy Books
  23. The Guest Book

    “I began The Guest Book expecting an excellent family saga set, in part, on an island in Maine. The magic of the family home is palpable as three generations build loyalty, identity, and memories there. But what I read was far, far more. This is a history of our country’s evolution through matters of race, class, and politics, and it relates compellingly to our current struggles with those topics as the characters grapple with the underpinnings of privilege, familial love, and morality. Sarah Blake has written a stunning and complex novel that lingers in your mind long after the last page.”

    Brookline Booksmith image Dana Brigham, Brookline Booksmith
  24. Black Leopard, Red Wolf

    “Marlon James’ Black Leopard, Red Wolf is a shot across the bow of fantasy literature: bold, fresh, and filled with brutal wonder and endless imagination. James’tale set in a fantastical ancient Africa follows a hunter known only as Tracker as he trails the scent of a lost boy, meeting a shape-shifting leopard along the way. At turns hallucinatory, dreamlike, and nightmarish, Black Leopard, Red Wolf’s world envelops the reader in its stink, grime, sweat, and blood. Never has a magical world felt quite so otherworldly and yet frighteningly tactile at the same time. This is literary fantasy as you’ve never encountered it before and a truly original tale of love, loss, power, and identity.”

    Bookmarks image Caleb Masters, Bookmarks
  25. Normal People

    “What a treat to discover Sally Rooney! This novel stands out shining from the current onslaught of mediocre prose and less-than-suspenseful thriller plots. Normal People is the story of a relationship between two high school classmates in a small town in Ireland, and how it changes over time, through their last year of college in Dublin. Rooney’s spare and brilliant writing illuminates her insight and makes the unfolding of these two personalities completely compelling.”

    Georgiana Dix Blomberg image Georgiana Dix Blomberg, Magnolia's Bookstore
  26. By Kate Quinn / Narrated by Saskia Maarleveld

    The Huntress

    “Nina is a teenaged girl in Siberia who runs away from her abusive father and ends up being one of the night witches in an all-woman bomber squadron in the Russian air force. Ian is a battle worn world renowned journalist who has put up his pen in order to hunt Nazi war criminals, especially The Huntress who murdered his young brother. Jordan is a teenager in Boston in 1950 who has fallen in love with photography and one day hopes to travel the world as a photo journalist. Nina, Ian and Jordan, who you will get to know intimately, are the heart of one of the best novels of historical fiction I have read in years. Their very individual voices were enhanced by listening to the audio version. From Russia and the little known story of one of the most successful bombing squadrons, to post war Boston where no one wants to be reminded of the war, you will be mesmerized by the stories of how the war and its aftermath affected those in it and around it. Quinn weaves their stories intricately together as they all end up in Boston on the trail of The Huntress. It is a thriller, a piece of history and a love story all combined into one book that you don’t want to miss.”

    Fiction Addiction image Nancy, Fiction Addiction
  27. A mayor's inspirational story of a Midwest city that has become nothing less than a blueprint for the future of American renewal. Once described by the Washington Post as "the most interesting mayor you've never heard of," Pete Buttigieg, the thirty-six-year-old Democratic mayor of South Bend, Indiana, has improbably emerged as one of the... Read More »

  28. The Hunting Party

    “Lucy Foley’s The Hunting Party is a slick, streamlined murder mystery set on a remote Scottish luxury estate. A group of old friends get together for their yearly New Year’s trip, but after over a decade of closeness, some of them may be near the breaking point. Foley uses the multiple-narrator approach to distort the reader’s perspective and challenge their assumptions, but it doesn’t feel excessive. With multiple puzzles that come together to create the bigger picture and a short timeline that adds to the claustrophobic urgency, this novel is a devilishly thrilling winter read.”

    Annie Metcalf image Annie Metcalf, Magers & Quinn Booksellers
  29. Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine

    “Eleanor Oliphant has quickly become one of my favorite fictional characters, and this novel one of my favorite books. Eleanor is completely original and the right kind of weird. Her life and her past, combined with such kindhearted characters, made for a compulsively readable, heartwarming story that I did not want to put down. I can't wait for this book to come out so many more can fall in love with Eleanor. Highly, highly recommended.”

    Copperfield's Books image Kaitlin Smith, Copperfield's Books
  30. Winner of the Audiophile Magazine Earphones Award.

    The classic collaboration from the internationally bestselling authors Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett, soon to be an original series starring Michael Sheen and David Tennant.

    "Good Omens . . . is something like what would have happened if Thomas Pynchon, Tom Robbins and Don DeLillo had... Read More »

  31. The Song of Achilles

    “This is one of the best books I've ever read. Do your heart a favor and read this beautiful, tender, heartbreaking book.”

    Mysterious Galaxy Books image Kelly, Mysterious Galaxy Books
  32. How to Change Your Mind

    “Pollan brings his humor, lyricism, and love for deep research to the admittedly taboo field of psychedelics. This book is an exhaustive exploration of these mysterious substances, in which he balances skepticism of the culture that surrounds them with optimism for their potential therapeutic use.”

    Parnassus Books image Kevin, Parnassus Books
  33. Furious Hours

    In Cold Blood and To Kill a Mockingbird kept me up reading all night as a teen, and I can now add Furious Hours to the list of couldn’t-put-it-down tomes. I was enthralled, educated, and awestruck by Casey Cep’s well-researched and masterfully written true-crime account of a rural minister, his lawyer, and his killer. Thankfully, Cep discovered and brought to light what surely could have been Harper Lee’s second bestseller. Now…off to get a good night’s rest!”

    Viewpoint Books image Beth Stroh, Viewpoint Books
  34. The Sentence is Death

    “Another fine mystery from Mr. Horowitz! The second installment of the modern day Sherlock & Watson duo is just as delightful as the first. Follow Mr Horowitz as he tries to outsmart, or even catch up to, the dazzling Hawthorne. Full of authenticity and warmth this mystery will have you guessing right up until the final pages!”

    Books & Company image Genavieve, Books & Company
  35. By Tehlor Kay Mejia / Narrated by Kyla Garcia

    We Set the Dark on Fire

    “Tehlor Kay Mejia's imaginative LGBTQ YA debut fantasy starts in mythology and ends in open rebellion. In between she builds a culture we know deeply without knowing at all, and characters trapped in consequences of old choices and trying to invent new ones. While the latter speaks to the novel's appeal to YA readers, the former also pulls in adult fantasy fans. That the story's fantasy world is Latinx adds to its complexity - for some readers this will make the world more haunting in its strangeness while for others it will be more haunting in its familiarity. Kyle Garcia's narration is exactly right. A great summer road trip listen!”

    Big Blue Marble Bookstore image Elliott, Big Blue Marble Bookstore
  36. The Witch Elm

    “A burglary gone awry, a near-perfect life destroyed, a mind torn. Toby is caring for his dying uncle and finding himself again. When a skull is found in the wych elm, it seems that a decades-old murder may tear apart a family and Toby himself, as he tries to piece together what happened—and what he might have done. A haunting novel portrayed by a narrator unreliable to himself.”

    Bookshop Santa Cruz image Jocelyn, Bookshop Santa Cruz
  37. An American Marriage

    “Tayari Jones comes in fierce with An American Marriage. Delving into the lives of the newly married Roy and Celestial, this is a novel that pulls no punches from beginning to end. I won't ruin the surprise, but they're hit with a harrowing event that will define not only their relationship, but each of their lives, forever. Writing with an intensity and pace worthy of Donna Tartt, Jones yanks us into her characters' lives with a grip that never lets up. I cannot wait to put this in people's hands!”

    Angela Spring image Angela Spring, Duende District
  38. I Miss You When I Blink

    “Mary Laura Philpott writes about today’s American woman in her marvelously frank and witty book of essays, I Miss You When I Blink. Women of all ages will nod their heads when reading about the decision to have babies (or not), the pitfalls of volunteering, the difficulty of getting a cat out from under the bed, the reward of crossing things off ‘the list,’ the challenge of finding time for relaxation, and, above all, the acceleration of time as we age. Philpott shares pivotal moments from her life in such a relatable way that, through both laughter and tears, readers will exclaim, ‘Yes, yes, this is ME!’ Don’t miss this gem!”

    Vault Books and Brew image Nancy Simpson-Brice, Vault Books and Brew
  39. A Man Called Ove

    “A curmudgeon, a curious cat and a quirky cast of supporting characters make for a delightful summer read in "A Man Called Ove" by Fredrik Backman. Meet Ove, a dark, disinterested in life leftover, desperate to find the peace he lacks. Lucky for Ove, his new neighbors don't know how to back up a U-haul trailer. Or, how to control their chatty, chaotic children. Give it a few chapters to unravel the story line and you'll fall hook, line and sinker into this tale. I laughed, I cried...and, once finished, I cried some more. Definitely a must-listen for all of us wishing we could say EXACTLY what we mean, at least once in a lifetime!”

    McLean & Eakin Booksellers image Kristin, McLean & Eakin Booksellers
  40. By Angie Thomas / Narrated by Bahni Turpin

    The Hate U Give

    “This bestselling, powerful young adult novel about social justice and one teen girl's effort to fight for what is right, will leave you breathless. The narration by Bahni Turpin is hands down the best I've ever heard. This is such an important book it should be required reading for life in general. Or listening. Definitely listening.”

    Tattered Cover image Kristen, Tattered Cover
  41. Lincoln in the Bardo

    “Saunders' first novel has a steep entry curve. It's not a novel that reveals itself quickly and easily, but if you give it your attention, if you burrow deep into the book, you'll be eminently rewarded. There is a richness and depth of humanity here. There is the strange and wonderful. There is love and grief and mystery all brought together in the story of Abraham Lincoln's dead son, the Civil War, and what may happen to us all after we leave the mortal coil. It's a beautiful and moving book that will stay with you for a long, long while.”

    University Book Store image Jason Vanhee, University Book Store
  42. A struggling novelist travels the world to avoid an awkward wedding in this hilarious Pulitzer Prize-winning novel full of "arresting lyricism and beauty" (The New York Times Book Review).

    WINNER OF THE PULITZER PRIZE
    National Bestseller
    A New York Times Notable Book of 2017
    A Washington Post Top Ten Book of 2017
    A San Francisco Chronicle Top Ten... Read More »

  43. The Current

    “Tim Johnston’s brand of storytelling is a curious hybrid of conventional crime fiction and observation of human nature that demands attention. In The Current, Johnston goes beyond the sensational and asks relevant questions when tragedy strikes, addressing real topics that come with the loss of a loved one and the questions that follow a horrific crime. As with Johnston’s previous novel, Descent, his latest concludes with a wallop you will not see coming.”

    The Book Table image Javier Ramirez, The Book Table
  44. By Min Jin Lee / Narrated by Allison Hiroto

    Pachinko (National Book Award Finalist)

    “A father's gentle nature, a mother's sacrifice, a daughter's trust, and a son's determination are the cornerstones of this grand, multilayered saga. Pachinko follows one family through an ever-changing cultural landscape, from 1910 Korea to 1989 Japan. As the bonds of family are put to the test in the harsh realities of their world, Sunja and those she holds dear manage to carve themselves a place to call home with hard work, self sacrifice, and a little kimchi. Through it all is a message about love, faith, and the deep-rooted bonds of family. Min Jin Lee gives us a phenomenal story about one family's struggle that resonates with us today. It will take hold of you and not let go!”

    Jennifer Steele image Jennifer Steele, Boswell Book Company
  45. The River

    “Peter Heller can take you on a journey through nature like no other writer. The River is the story of two close friends wanting nothing more than to enjoy their time together on a trip through the Canadian wilderness, and fly fishing has never been so beautifully portrayed nor has the serenity of water and nature. But the peacefulness slowly wanes and the tension begins to build as the trip becomes a race against encroaching forest fires and an attempt to save the life of the mysterious woman they have picked up along the way. Heller has created a story of friendship and survival that should not be missed.”

    Rainy Day Books image Mary McBride, Rainy Day Books
  46. The House of Impossible Beauties

    “Joseph Cassara's debut novel follows the life of Angel, a young transgender woman who goes on to become the "House Mother" of the legendary House of Xtravaganza. Gritty, yet always tender, House of Impossible Beauties explores the 1980's Harlem drag ball scene made famous in Jennie Livingston's documentary Paris is Burning in a way that is humanizing, deeply interesting, and impossible to put down. I was so entranced with this book that I went through it twice: once on the page and once on audio, which might have been an even more interesting experience, simply because narrator Christian Barillas presents a singular performance, uniquely emulating each character in a way that tattoos them indelibly on the mind. A 10/10 listening experience.”

    The King's English Bookshop image Rachel, The King's English Bookshop
  47. Magpie Murders

    “Who better than the talented Anthony Horowitz to create this marvelous mystery within a mystery. Yes, we're treated to two mysteries for the price of one: One set in a peaceful village in England during the 1950s with the one and only Detective Atticus Pund taking the case, and the other set in contemporary times with a book editor who becomes an amateur sleuth. Horowitz pays tribute to the golden age of British crime with references to mysteries created by the likes of Dorothy Sayers and Agatha Christie. How many hidden gems can you come up with? A perfect book to read in a cushy chair with a cup of tea (hot or iced).”

    Books & Company image Ken Favell, Books & Company
  48. Bad Blood

    “Theranos was a startup that set itself apart from the bevy of others in Silicon Valley. Its cause was noble, manufacturing revolutionary medical technology that could run a menu of blood tests on only a finger stick's worth of blood, eliminating the need for large painful needles. There was only one problem: the technology didn't exist. Painstakingly researched but still accessible to the medical layman, Pulitzer prize-winning journalist John Carreyrou investigates the meteoric rise and fall of Theranos, exploring how the company managed to fool the public, investors, board members like George Schultz and Henry Kissinger, and even Barack Obama. A must for true crime podcast fans, especially if you find yourself needing a break from the more gruesome stuff.”

    Square Books image Maggie, Square Books
  49. The Mother-in-Law

    “Family relationships are often complicated and misunderstood especially between mother and daughter in laws, but do they usually end in murder? This is the question to be answered in Hepworth’s masterfully plotted novel of families and expectations each has of the other. Lucy is yearning for a mother figure since her mother died when she was young. Diana seems to be the total opposite of what Lucy was hoping for in a MIL. Lucy begins to believe that Diana doesn’t even like her at all. When Diana, a prominent and very wealthy member of the community is found dead of an apparent suicide and the police begin to believe foul play we finally see the characters as they really are. Did Diana finally push Lucy too far? Perfect for fans of Liane Moriarty.”

    Fiction Addiction image Nancy, Fiction Addiction
  50. Killers of the Flower Moon

    “In "Killers of the Flower Moon", David Grann recounts the tragic tale of the Osage Indian Nations decimation and deceit at the hands of their government appointed guardians. Motivated by money, morally corrupt and masterfully manipulative, the true role of these benevolent benefactors, perpetrators of mass murder, is still a mystery today. Granns detailed, yet deeply disturbing detective work, back to the birth of the FBI and the rise of J. Edgar Hoover, unveils an unimaginable injustice overlooked for 85 years. Let’s not allow this atrocious act against the Osage to slip back into obscurity ever again.”

    McLean & Eakin Booksellers image Kristin, McLean & Eakin Booksellers
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